Google Webmaster Question: Can Duplicated Localized Content Hurt Your Site?

I came across an interesting take on localized web content and its effect on search results. Companies often have different versions of the same site that have been tweaked in terms of language and currency. Google often penalizes duplicate content since spammers try to take advantage of repeating links over and over again. But have no fear, Google recognizes the hard work real companies put into their sites. Watch below and learn first-hand from Google Webmaster guru Matt Cutts.

Upcoming Webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization

Mister Zebra and Miss Giraffe introduce you to Lingoport’s next webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization.

This webinar will feature a panel of software development, internationalization and localization professionals and will be held on Wednesday, August 3rd at 12:30pm EDT.

Technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, technical writers, content developers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to optimize their global software releases are encouraged to attend.

Sign up here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

Lingoport and Acrolinx Marketing Departments Partner for Friday Afternoon Barbecue

On a glorious Friday afternoon, Lingoport welcomed a member of the Acrolinx marketing department for their monthly company barbecue. Jennifer Beaupre, VP of Global Marketing for Acrolinx, was the guest of honor as pleasantries were exchanged over scrumptious hamburgers, hot dogs, watermelon and potato salad.

Lingoport’s software engineers joined as well, making an appearance outside of the attic where they typically spend weeks-on-end dealing with software internationalization issues and needy customers (this marks the first time they’ve been let outside since they were given the weekend off for St. Patrick’s Day).

Beaupre, making a surprise appearance, said that, “I was hesitant to come to the Lingoport offices, knowing what I’ve heard before,” but went on to add, “Chris Raulf (Lingoport’s Marketing Director & Grill Master) begged and begged until I felt like I had no choice but to come.”

Raulf’s grilling skills were on display as he prepared a feast of lean meat for the hungry workers. He was especially stoked for the occasion as Lingoport Grilling Union Head, Spencer Thomas, noted. “Chris was listening to Grillz by Nelly over and over again and yelling out “let me see your grill” to everyone in the office.” Thomas added that he tried to explain to Raulf that Nelly’s song was referring to a grille –a piece of jewelry– not a grill meant for cooking. Raulf, a native of Switzerland, did not understand the difference.

Brazil Emerging as Game Localization Market

Brazil’s emergence on the tech scene has allowed game developers a whole new market to cater to. Recently, Hazit Online Games partnered with Brussels, Belgium-based localization company MO Group International to help aid their localization development for games in Brazil. The full press release is available here: http://www.gamasutra.com/view/pressreleases/73785/Hazit_Online_Games_Chooses_MO_Group_International_for_SecondMMO_Localization_Project.php

Successful localization in Brazil is a great example for companies looking to take advantage of new emerging markets, especially for games. As I wrote a couple weeks ago, companies are taking advantage of Chinese emergence by providing free access to software and providing paid add-ons once trust is established. This sort of market understanding is a successful localization strategy in that companies need not only to translate, but adapt their software and marketing strategy upon entering a new locale.

i18n Scorecard Webinar Recording

Last week, we held a webinar in conjunction with Mike McKenna, the Senior Manager of International Engineering with Zynga and Leandro Reis, the Senior Globalization Program Manager with Adobe, on Lingoport’s new internationalization scorecard. We had great attendance from a wide variety of industry professionals and thank all of you who attended.

How Does Localization Relate to Social Media?

This post was inspired by an article written by Clinton Lanier on Technorati. The article can be viewed here: http://technorati.com/business/article/a-new-theory-of-social-media/

Many companies use social media to get in direct contact with their customer base. This allows consumers to engage with each other as well as the product makers about their issues, concerns, recommendations or satisfaction with a product. This instant feedback approach has reshaped how companies deal with customers: feedback is instant.

But what if their is no forum for your company’s customers to discuss their concerns in their own language using their own forum? Companies that have localized their product to multiple locales need also to consider localizing their social media messages for that same location. As I wrote before in a post about localized software in China, a successfully localized product considers all aspects of a product, not just translation. This same idea applies to the social aspects of said product.

A feedback avenue should be established for international customers to discuss their concerns, just as there is for domestic customers. In his article, Lanier suggests companies establish a social media presence in every locale they sell in, but his argument doesn’t necessarily apply to tech companies. His examples include Starbucks and Panera Bread shaping their message to specific demographics across a country (Happy Cinco de Mayo! Show this tweet and receive a free drink!). This messaging is effective for its goal, but goals as they relate to software and technology are obviously different (and that’s what we’re focusing on here).

Companies that have localized well have already established a presence within the locales they sell in. Assuming a trust has been created between the company and the consumer in a locale, setting up a social media avenue should be easy. My suggestion would be to do a little research into what social media platforms are most popular in a given locale, and set up an account focused on that area. Assuming your product has already been localized to that area, you should be familiar with the concerns of customers in that locale. Use this background information to establish a dialogue with customers to help further refine your product. Localization isn’t a one-time process, it’s ongoing and never ending as technology improves at an incredible rate. Staying on the front lines through social media will undoubtedly help shape a successful localization campaign.

Power Outage Strikes Lingoport as New Site Launched; Globalyzer Demo Held

To commemorate the launch of the new Lingoport.com, a power outage struck a small section of North Boulder, cutting the company’s internet access. The power loss came at a time at which the company’s new website was being launched and just minutes before a Globalyzer demonstration was to be held. Thinking on their feet, employees of Lingoport quickly packed their bags and headed to a nearby co-worker’s  house where the internet access was plentiful. Here, the team simultaneously held a demo and executed a successful launch of the new Lingoport.com.

The squad referenced the leadership of President Adam Asnes in their gameplan. Marketing Director Chris Raulf said that, “we train for moments like this. You have to be able to think on your feet during these high-pressure situations.” Experts note that Lingoport has had strong drafts in recent years leading to a team-first mentality.