Is Globalization Endangering Increasingly Rare Languages?

This blog post is a summary of a post written by Nigel Hollis for the M&M Blog.

The trend in language and globalization suggests that rare languages only spoken by a few people in specific areas are dying off. Nigel Hollis suggests the opposite is happening is some areas as teenagers in places like the Philippines, Mexico and Chile are reviving their local languages through social media. This attraction to dying languages is an interesting way for young people to identify with a group and feel like they belong. I often see this phenomenon within groups of friends after you have spent a great deal of time with them. You develop your own language or “code”; different phrases have different meanings, inside jokes are developed, and only the people within your group understand the full meaning behind everything you say.

But this developing trend has important consequences that global businesses need to consider. As I have touched on before, social media acts as the face of a company; the place were consumers and potential consumers communicate with each other and with the company about their wants, needs and concerns. Hollis notes groups want to affirm their cultural identity in the face of globalization. People like to stay in their comfort zone, so it is important for companies to provide a forum where their customers feel comfortable. Applying a specific strategy in each locale is paramount to the long-term success of a global business.

For the full article, please visit http://blog.creamglobal.com/right_brain_left_brain/2011/07/digital-media-facilitate-localization-as-well-as-globalization.html

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