Website Localization: Factors to Consider

The Emergence of Brazil

With nearly one-third of the world population using the internet, more and more opportunities are arising for people to communicate and for companies to reach new markets. Adapting an e-commerce website to a new locale has become an essential way for online businesses to survive and thrive in new markets. In an insightful post from the GPI Translation Blog, we learn first hand some of the strategies that go into localizing a website for a new locale; specifically Brazil.

Brazil will be in the world spotlight in the coming years with the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. China gets the headlines as the next economic superpower, but Brazil lies-in-wait as another market ready to explode. With a current base of 50 million Internet users, Brazil presents an excellent business opportunity for companies. But what specifically must be done to sell to these new consumers? Selling strategies in the United States do not stick in Brazil; new approaches must be developed.

Brazilian Market

  • The Internet is predominantly used by upper and middle-classes, but government initiatives have worked to gain funding for Internet cafes to help lower income groups have Internet access.

Brazilian Consumers & Culture

  • Brazilian society places high importance on looking good and appearance.
  • Brazilians prefer goods made within their own country whenever possible.
  • Decision-making power for Brazilian women has increased.
  • Brazilians are often budget-conscious and look for the absolute best value they can find.
  • Latin cultures place great emphasis on family and community, Brazil included.
  • Brazilian culture values masculinity which can be depicted as achievement, success, adventure and fun.

Brazilian Portuguese vs. European Portuguese

  • When localizing a website for Brazil, consider many of the spelling and verb tense differences within the two main Portuguese dialects.

SEO & SEM in Brazil

  • As all marketing strategies go, Brazilian SEO campaigns need to be multidimensional.
  • Be advised that while focusing on Portuguese search terms is important, bilingual users also use English to search and navigate the Internet.
  • Keywords and key phrases need not just be translated. Cultural and linguistic issues affect what people search for.

For more information on this subject, please visit:  http://blog.globalizationpartners.com/brazilian-website-localization.aspx

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Lingoport & Acrolinx to Host Expert Panel Discussion on Leading Globalized Software Development

Presentation and Panel Discussion Features Industry Thought Leaders from Cisco, Intel, Rearden Commerce, Acrolinx, Lingoport, and GlobalPragmatica

BOULDER, CO – September 20, 2011 – Lingoport, a leading provider of software internationalization (i18n) tools and i18n consulting services, announced today that it will co-host with Acrolinx, the world’s leading provider of Information Quality Management software, a special event on the eve of Localization World in Santa Clara on Monday, October 10th starting at 2:30pm.

The event features Tex Texin, Chief Globalization Architect at Rearden Commerce, Andrew Bredenkamp, CEO at Acrolinx, Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel, Richard Faubert, Manager, Software Development QA at Cisco, and Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport. Erin Vang, owner of GlobalPragmatica, will be moderating the panel discussion.

Adam Asnes, President & CEO at Lingoport, notes, “We were able to assemble an expert group of industry veterans who will be sharing many of their own best practices and also discuss strategies that contribute to leading globalized software development at their respective companies. We’re all looking forward to hosting a very dynamic session and hope to answer many of the audiences’ questions.”

In an interactive presentation and panel format, these industry experts will present and discuss

  • Developing software for the world
  • Closing the loop between internationalization (i18n) and localization (L10n)
  • Content authoring with localization in mind
  • Measuring software development for globalization
  • How to justify and gaining approval for software globalization (i18n and L10n) from management
  • Measuring ROI on your globalization projects
  • Agile software development and i18n & L10n, and much more

The event is open to customer-side internationalization, localization, and globalization managers, software developers and engineers, content developers, and anyone interested in understanding and promoting the software globalization process and the effects i18n and L10 have on an organization as a whole.

For additional information and to register, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/training-events/leading-globalized-software-development-i18n-l10n/ or contact Chris Raulf at craulf@lingoport.com or call 303.444. 0637.

Lingoport also announces that it recently hosted a webinar presentation on justifying software globalization to management. The webinar featured guest-speaker Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel and is now available for playback at:http://www.lingoport.com/webinars/justifying-software-globalization-management/.

About Lingoport (www.lingoport.com)
Lingoport helps globally focused technology companies adapt their software for worldwide markets with expert internationalization and localization consulting and Globalyzer software.
Globalyzer, a market leading software internationalization tool, helps entire enterprises and development teams to effectively internationalize existing and newly developed source code and to prepare their applications for localization.

For more information, please visit http://www.lingoport.com or http://www.globalyzer.com or contact Lingoport at +1 303 444 8020 orinfo@lingoport.com.

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Debunking the Hispanic Technology-Use Stereotype

In a recent interview by eMarketer with Marla Skiko, Director of Digital Innovation of SMG Multicultural, we discover that the Hispanic market is in fact thriving as a technology market, refuting the myth that the demographic are typically late adopters of technology.

There are a number of assumptions companies make when honing in on the Hispanic market when it comes to technology and tech products; many of which are mere myths that, when uncovered, reveal a thriving market. The value Hispanics place on their heritage is an essential understanding to how they engage online. Hispanic families are typically larger and very open with each other. This cultural knack for openness and sharing lends itself nicely to social media, and as Skiko states in her interview, “With Latinas, when you create something that’s relevant, it becomes a part of their life, it’s what they’re interested in.” The next step is where marketers come in and join the conversation. Skiko also states that not only does the same technology trendsetter status (especially with younger users) appeal to the Hispanic market as it does many other markets, but emerging technologies like mobile phones and voice-over IP are more cost effective. There’s no point to use a landline when only one person can use it at a time!

There are perceptions that Hispanics are typically late adopters of technology and aren’t frequenters of the Internet. These perceptions, as Skiko says, are false, and there is research to prove it. Marketers aren’t looking in the right places and aren’t taking the necessary time to understand the Hispanic consumer. If marketers and advertisers “bring them relevant content and reach out to them with messages that resonate,” then they will find success.

For the full article, please visit http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008592

We recently held a webinar on culturalizing your company’s brand. For information specific on culturalizing for Hispanic markets, view the recording here and start at the 48:25 mark: http://vimeo.com/28169868

 

 

Webinar Recording: Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Last week we held a webinar on justifying the globalization of software to management and received a great deal of interest.  Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel joined Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport for an informative one-hour discussion on the specifics of how to clearly communicate the needs for software internationalization.

Key points of the presentation

  • Business case for i18n
  • Development hurdles
  • Costs: opportunity costs & product costs
  • What happens without i18n?
  • 30-minute question & answer session: what does Intel do for internationalization?

Creating a Multilingual SEO Plan

Multilingual SEO Best Practices

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is a valuable way to reach your market and increase relevant traffic to your website. Often times, however, companies that localize their site in multiple languages neglect to implement the same strategies they use in their original content SEO. When done effectively, multilingual SEO can be more valuable than traditional advertising methods and can put your company’s content right in front of a potential customer.

Managing Content Costs

Naturally, there are budgetary constraints on how much content can be localized with tender loving care. Granted, machine translation is easy, but that translated content may not pass along the same message if it isn’t translated professionally. So prioritizing which content would be most valuable to translate for a foreign market is essential to monitoring costs and ensuring quality.

Keyword Research

A basic principle in marketing is understanding how your potential customers think; how will they describe their needs in terms of your product. Through monitoring analytics and reviewing what keywords are most useful to draw views to a website, can you determine what phrases and words to focus on when optimizing SEO. The same idea applies to multilingual SEO. But simply translating a popular English search phrase or keyword into Spanish, for example, isn’t the most effective way to optimize in Spanish (have you ever tried to translate curse words and/or phrases? It’s not really the same is it?). Understanding how your translated content will be found by your target market is essential. Use your company’s resources in your target locale. Have the in-country marketing team review and approve translated keywords and phrases.

Enhance your Reputation

Providing great content to your customers is a great way to establish trust. When your international customers see that your and your company are making an effort to communicate clearly with them, that extra effort is appreciated, leading to an improved reputation and increased sales.

It all boils down to understanding your market. What are your customers needs? What can you provide to fill those needs? Helping your customers make informed decisions, in all languages, is paramount to maintaining a successful global brand.

View Lingoport’s latest webinar to learn about culturizing your brand.

For more information on this topic, please view Best Practices: Successfully Marketing Your Brand to a Global Audience

I18n Firm Finishes out Summer Grilling Season with Wild Burnout

Renowned leader in software internationalization, Lingoport, finished out the summer work grilling season today with one final wild burnout today. All members of the staff were invited to the porch on a glorious Friday afternoon in Boulder to witness what may go down in history as the greatest display of grilling prowess.

Lingoport Grillmaster, Chris Raulf, showed his veteran leadership as he prepared multiple hot dogs and hamburgers for his crazy coworkers. Gravity tried to knock the grill over, but Chris, like a true leader, said, “Stop that gravity, you may not tip over our grill!” Gravity listened and did not knock all the scrumptious meat off the grill. Lingoport Grilling Union head, Spencer Thomas noted Chris’ quick response: “His reflexes were astounding; almost superhero-like. Now that you mention it, they still haven’t identified the Spiderman have they? Hmm…”

The afterparty is where the real magic happened as the no-longer hungry workers danced to some beats thrown down by DJ Skrillex, the biggest name in dubstep. The fun had to be halted, however, after several noise complaints prompted Boulder police to raid the premises. Neighbors cited the fact that the dubstep music they heard playing was, “One of the most annoying collection of noises ever recorded.” Lingoport staff complied quickly and orderly with the police, telling the DJ to go home. One minor indecent was recorded when Grilling Union Member Jeff Flasck tried to steal one of the police cars. Bail was quickly posted and Jeff was sent into timeout.

Facebook Set to Introduce Translation Feature on Comments

With the introduction and prominence of Google’s web translator, companies like Facebook have a more prominent need to provide users with translation features within their display. Often times users, myself included, will leave their Facebook tab to translate something their friends commented on or made a status about. Since introducing Facebook in multiple languages, users have soared to 750 million people. Obviously in such a connected world, these users need the ability to communicate quickly with each other, and Facebook is prepared to provide that plugin.

Languages available for translation will be few at first, and include English, Spanish, French, Hebrew and Chinese. At times, translations will be unavailable due to unrecognizable comments, which happens sometimes with the slang used by many users (everybody has their own language, even groups of friends). This feature could help to further help the world communicate through social media.

One thought I had about rapid translation (especially among friends) is that it may hinder the need for multiple languages to be learned by one person. Sometimes I enjoy staring at a friend’s Spanish status or comment and figuring out what they’re saying myself; people learn better that way. Granted, it’s not like the feature is an automatic translator: it’s a clickable button (meaning the user has a choice whether to click it or not). But hey, maybe we’ll all end up with a babel fish in our ear and understand every language…

For more, read Inside Facebook