Argentina: A Burgeoning Game Development Market

A globalization success; Formerly low development costs turn into high quality

The video game industry has seen an explosion in Latin America over the past ten years as developers have begun to meet industry standards after previously being a place known for cheap labor.

Historically, the video game industry has been concentrated in the US, Europe and Asia, but Latin American developers have emerged while attracting funding for game development for brands Facebook and MTV.

“It has been proven that [the Latin American video game] industry is really up to the standards, and we can compete with good quality works coming from the most important markets abroad. It’s not about costs as much as it used to be,” says Hernán Rozenwasser, CEO of QB9. “Another thing that sets us apart is our artistic traditions: Argentina has always produced high-quality movies, television and music, and that shows up in our work too.”

Software globalization brought cheaper access to hardware and software for universities and schools, allowing those with their eye on software development to pursue something they loved. Political and socioeconomic hardship have led Latin American young people to develop a fierce independent streak, an attribute critical for tech innovation.

Many of the industry’s most recognized names are attending trade shows in South America:

James Portnow, CEO of Seattle-based Rainmaker Games, who was a keynote speaker at the Argentina Video Games Exposition in Buenos Aires on November 11, said: “Five years ago, when I first started looking at Latin America, there was no gaming industry here; you had some people really hoping, really passionate about games, but no actual businesses. Today, I see a burgeoning market.

“Latin America still has a relatively small gaming community. There is so much potential, so I would encourage developers here to concentrate on building up their internal market.”

The trend is expected to continue as mobile and social game applications gain steam internationally.

For more, read Argentina’s video gamers take on the world

Want to learn more about adapting mobile and social games for international markets? Attend our free webinar on December 1st at 11am PT: Lingoport.com/mobile-games-webinar


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How the iPod Explains Globalization

Innovation and Job Creation in a Global Economy

A New York Times article published in June explores the research done by a trio of researchers – Greg Linden, University of California, Berkeley; Jason Dedrick, Syracuse University; and Kenneth L. Lraemer, University of California, Irvine – as to the relationship of a product (Apple’s iPod) to the globalization economy as a whole. The paper, entitled Innovation and Job Creation in a Global Economy: The Case of Apple’s iPod, was written in response to the growing assumption that domestic innovation only increases jobs abroad, leaving domestic workers without jobs.

From NYTimes.com:

Now come what might be the surprises. The first is that even though most of the iPod jobs are outside the United States, the lion’s share of the iPod salaries are in America. Those 13,920 American workers earned nearly $750 million. By contrast, the 27,250 non-American Apple employees took home less than $320 million.

That disparity is even more significant when you look at the composition of America’s iPod workforce. More than half the U.S. jobs — 7,789 — went to retail and other nonprofessional workers, like office support staff and freight and distribution workers. But those workers earned just $220 million.

As with everything, there are winners a losers. In this case, the winners are the Apple innovators and shareholders, while the losers are those who look grimly at “the American iPod jobs [that] are relatively poorly paid and low-skilled.”

The full New York Times article is available to read at: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/01/world/asia/01iht-letter01.html?_r=1

The research piece is available at: http://pcic.merage.uci.edu/papers/2011/InnovationJobCreationiPod.pdf

Join our upcoming webinar on December 1st at 11am PT to learn about the strategies used in localizing a major online music store


World Gaming Executive Magazine Launch

The gaming community recently saw the release of a comprehensive digital magazine targeting world gaming executives and providing in-depth articles for the those in all facets of the gaming community. Below is an excerpt from World Gaming Executives Director John Armstrong:

Great news on the launch of World Gaming Executives Magazine WGE:MAG just 2 weeks ago. Since that time, there have been over 2500 downloads, the number of daily visitors to www.worldgamingexecutives.com has doubled and one particular article in the magazine has been picked up by dozens of gaming magazines including Eurogamer (and translated into 6 languages -that we know of).

Not seen the magazine yet? Take a look here:
http://www.worldgamingexecutives.com/page/articles-2

An interesting idea shared in the magazine is that of grabbing your audiences attention. No matter what business you’re in, your goal is to earn attention from your customers, both current and potential. Without attention there is no business. Brands have been jumping on the gaming trend to further increase their interaction with customers. Zynga, for example, has created its own virtual economy where users can purchase upgrades for their games and advertisers can target specific users. This must be done subtly, however, as gamers don’t like clunky in-your-face ads.

But where is the next wave of attention coming from? With the emergence of more developed and sophisticated users internationally, it’s hard to ignore the emerging opportunities to globalize social and mobile games. To learn more about these trends, and the projected value of adapting games to new locales, I encourage you to read Social & Mobile Apps and Globalization – Confessions of a g11n Veteran 


Sign up for an interactive webinar on December 1st at 11am PST on how to take your mobile games and apps global

Trends in Mobile & Social Applications

The global marketplace is booming for online games, social & mobile games and applications. We have been working with Danica Brinton of LocLabs –a heralded “rock star” in the social/mobile space– recently, and are delighted that she shared some of her insight with us.

Abstract from Social & Mobile Apps and Globalization

There is a level of instant gratification seen from the localization of social games unseen in comparison to software, handhelds, CPU’s, search and web services. This stems from the viral nature of the social-gaming sphere where users are inclined to share games that they enjoy and want to play with friends. Often overlooked, however is that 75% of Facebook users come from outside the US and most prominent social games have over 70% of their user base and 50% of their revenue coming from locales in which the game has been localized. As mobile smart phone adoption grows internationally, the percentages of international usage and revenue (after proper localization) will grow rapidly.

Another trend that presents interesting localization challenges is that of cross-platform apps and games; i.e.: switching Facebook, Android and iPhone platforms. Market tiers differ for these platforms, so do the research into what locales feature more prominently for each platform.

Lastly, it is often quoted that India and China are emerging in the mobile market. As of now, however, India does not necessitate language localization and Mainland China does not present a good positive ROI investment for app localization.


Submit a question for Danica for the upcoming webinar Taking your Mobile Apps Global on LocLabs’ Facebook page, Facebook.com/LocLabs


Register for Webinar: Games and Mobile i18n and L10n

 

 

 

 

Mobile & Global Business

With the recent surpassing of mobile web traffic over classic PC-based traffic, emphasis has been placed on businesses to establish themselves in the mobile realm. However, much of this mobile growth is coming internationally, leading to a need to integrate mobile development with localization.

Projections

Everyday we read the “latest projections” for mobile, each telling us a different statistic, but all demonstrating the same idea: mobile usage is surpassing PC usage and mobile usage is increasing in developing countries. ABI Research has indicated that mobile commerce will grow to $119bn by 2015. That a number that is hard to ignore, especially so when mobile phones often provides the only pathway to the internet for users in developing countries.

What Does This Mean for Global Business?

Businesses without an established plan to capitalize on increasing mobile use in developing markets are sure to fail in those markets. Surely, if one’s competition is localizing their mobile efforts in a market, then consumers in that market will prefer their products as if those products are their own. It’s a large initiative, but the process may already be in place…

Localization and Mobile

Companies that have previously localized their websites need only to adapt their site to mobile. This process is mostly test-intensive and involves checking functionality across mobile platforms. Localizing mobile apps is test-intensive as well, stemming from the differences in Android, Apple, Blackberry and Windows mobile operating systems.

It’s obviously important for businesses to keep up with these emerging trends to stay ahead of the competition. Assuming, however, competing businesses are operating under similar global initiatives, it comes down to who does it better; who has the best tools.

More Information on Mobile & Globalization

Stay tuned for an informational webinar on Thursday, December 1st from Lingoport CEO Adam Asnes and LocLabs CEO Danica Brinton who has worked on mobile and game localization strategies with many top global companies.

Survey on Software Localization

A call for participation has been announced for a survey from the University of West London that examines the interoperation of software development and localization processes and its influence on the quality and development effort. It is geared toward those that have participated in the creation of software for international markets, including websites. The survey is open until December 25, 2011.

The survey is available at: http://samsa.uwl.ac.uk/locdevsurvey/index.php?sid=75766&lang=en

Internationalization of Cisco’s TelePresence – Case Study

Republished from Lingoport.com

About Cisco TelePresence

Cisco TelePresence, which debuted in 2006, is an advanced video conferencing system developed by Cisco Systems. Designed to link together conference rooms at any two points in the world, TelePresence provides a 1080p video feed along with spatial audio, creating a virtual conference room.

Scope of Work

Cisco initially hired Lingoport to audit TelePresence source code for internationalization (i18n) issues in order to avoid potential costly issues before moving on to localization (L10n). Through a static analysis of the TelePresence code using Globalyzer—a client/server software internationalization system—Lingoport was able to establish a clear picture of the internationalization issues and create a well-defined path toward internationalization. This avoided the uncertain trial and error outcome of relying on iterative testing, script-based searching or human line-by-line review, which are slow, incomplete and error prone processes. With this understanding, Lingoport architects and Cisco engineering discussed best alternatives for an internationalization architectural approach, and built plans that accommodated release cycles for concurrent i18n and new feature development. Cisco then contracted with Lingoport to implement internationalization development and testing services.

Challenges

Though there had been initial efforts in some of the code to support internationalization, there was a large effort needed. TelePresence included several distinct application components, including multiple programming languages as well as sophisticated hardware and build environments. Concurrent product development was extremely active. A nearly year-long project plan was developed to support the release of TelePresence into 28 languages, and a number of additional locales. This plan was implemented within a busy development, testing and release schedule that had already been set.

In order to maintain the original development schedule and implement a robust internationalization plan, teams were augmented and allowed to branch off and work on their piece of the code.

The Lingoport Solution

Through the use of Lingoport’s Globalyzer i18n software, the teams were able to itemize and walk developers through code refactoring efforts. This facilitated tasks such as string externalization and changing methods/functions/classes and programming patterns that inhibited or prevented locale support requirements. Globalyzer also made the effort more scalable as developers had a clear path of action and utilities to speed up the process. Lingoport’s engineering team added internationalization support to the architecture and refactored code to support worldwide locale requirements. Additionally, when Cisco engineering added new code and features to the build,  it was checked using Globalyzer for new i18n issues. Internationalization criteria were added to testing protocols and functionality was assured. Lingoport and Cisco also coordinated with localization efforts so that L10n testing could be integrated with i18n functional testing, without delay.

For the full article, as well as the recording to the webinar Internationalizing and Localizing Cisco’s Telepresence – a Case Study, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/software-internationalization-clients/i18n-l10n-of-cisco-telepresence/