Webinar Recording: Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Last week we held a webinar on justifying the globalization of software to management and received a great deal of interest.  Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel joined Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport for an informative one-hour discussion on the specifics of how to clearly communicate the needs for software internationalization.

Key points of the presentation

  • Business case for i18n
  • Development hurdles
  • Costs: opportunity costs & product costs
  • What happens without i18n?
  • 30-minute question & answer session: what does Intel do for internationalization?
Advertisements

Top Ten Internationalization Mistakes to Avoid

This is a summary of an article written by Adam Asnes of Lingoport. For the full article, visit http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes 

Sometimes the best way to learn is through mistakes you have made in the past. While this may be true in the personal arena, making mistakes in business is costly. Lingoport has seen a number of internationalization mistakes cost companies money in the past. Here’s a list of the top ten problems businesses looking at internationalization need to realize.

  1. Don’t forget what drives internationalization: new customers in new markets
  2. Don’t assume internationalization is just an older software legacy issue: no framework, however new, is capable of internationalizing itself.
  3. Don’t assume you can treat internationalization like any other feature improvement when it comes to source control management.
  4. Don’t assume internationalization is just a string externalization exercise: the scope of i18n is much greater.
  5. Don’t wing it on locale: be sure to consider both language and location.
  6. Don’t create your very own internationalization framework: speak to somebody who has done it before.
  7. Don’t think that the team internationalizing your software can work without a working build: developers should be able to test as they go.
  8. Don’t run out of money: projects suffer from underscoping, resulting in costly release delays.
  9. Don’t use a half thought-out character encoding strategy: use Unicode.
  10. Don’t use your same testing plan, or just rely on localization testing, when your functional testing needs to grow to include internationalization requirements.

For full details, read the full article here: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes

Preparing an E-Commerce Site for a New Locale

This is a summary of an article on Lingoport.com from October 2009.

As I have shared in previous posts about localizing content for a specific locale, creating a website that works in multiple target locations is essential for creating an international business. If your company website sells to an international market or creates content that appeals to people around the world then it is important to communicate in a clear manner.

The process of preparing  a site can take time, but it is important to do it right the first time in order to save costs. Remember that simply translating a website into multiple languages doesn’t necessarily make it easier for international customers to use your site. There are differing date formats, currency formats, and address formats to consider; i.e.: England uses “postal codes” while the US uses “zip codes.” This difference is rather subtle, but as a company selling to international customers, it is important to be as clear and concise as possible throughout the purchasing process. This point brings up the difference between simply translating a site to multiple languages versus translating a site to multiple locales. Locales are more specific, obviously, and have their own purchasing behaviors.

On the more technical side, the architecture of the code in the back end of a site will likely need to be changed to support a new market. The process of internationalization extracting embedded code stings can more easily improve the process of translation, and ease the work load of software developers by cutting back the time it takes to search through lines and lines of code. Additionally, supporting the character set support Unicode offers will dismiss any mis-translated gibberish.

Now if you’re operating a smaller operation and consider machine translation, through Google Translate for example, then there are easily implementable strategies to consider when catering to an international audience. Using short, concise wording in your site’s content will help the machine translation better communicate your message. Additionally, when repeating the same idea, use the same phrase so that foreign readers can identify that you are talking about the same thing. Staying knowledgeable and up-to-date with your customers will go a long way in garnering success.

For the full article, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/building-a-site-for-worldwide-customers

Shrinking the Triangle

This is a summary of an article written by Lingoport’s Adam Asnes for the Oct./Nov. issue of Multilingual Magazine. For the full article, see the link below.

The good, fast or cheap (pick any two) triangle has been a topic for localization project managers since the charge towards new markets has become highly competitive. When looking at the barriers to entry into new markets, project managers have been investigating ways to shrink the triangle, so that good, fast and cheap can synchronize into one. 

First off, businesses are looking to keep up with the speed of the world today by being the first to enter into a market or the first to publish a story. Or as the great Will Ferrell once said as Ricky Bobby in Talladega Nights, “If you’re not first, you’re last.”  Secondly, the issue of good is often not even an issue for most businesses; it is expected and it must be proven. Lastly, cheap is often synonymous with poor quality. For this reason, buyers don’t want the cheap option, rather they settle for the good enough option.

Lingoport recently posed this question on LinkedIn discussion boards and got a passionate response from leading vendors and customers in the localization industry. This inspired a virtual roundtable webinar with localization professionals from the translation-side, localization vendor-side, internationalization-side, content development-side, tools and technology-side, as well as from the customer-side shared their view on how to potentially shrink the triangle.

For the full Shrinking the Triangle article by Adam Asnes, visit: http://www.lingoport.com/shrinking-the-triangle

Macroeconomic Argument for American Companies to Internationalize

Summary of article by Philip Guarino of Elementi Consulting (see link below)

You hear it in the news everyday… bad economy this, bad economy that. But are there opportunities that an otherwise good economy would not present?

That answer is yes.

Data gathered by the US Department of Commerce shows that American consumers are spending less and saving more. With exports playing a relatively small part in US GDP, this means that the domestic market that so many companies rely on isn’t yielding the same level of demand that it once did. Additionally, with the depreciating dollar, the power of the money earned domestically is also decreasing. The kicker here is that the dollar is now cheaper for foreign countries to buy. This gives foreign countries more incentive to import products from the US.

The next step is how; how can US companies take advantage of a devalued dollar in a struggling economy? Through internationalization of their products, US companies can make their products more appealing to foreign buyers, thus capitalizing on the increased buying power in the foreign market.

For the full article, visit http://www.elementiconsulting.com/insights/the-export-imperative/

Lingoport has helped companies reach international markets since 2001: http://www.lingoport.com/

Internationalization and Medical Translations

Recently, Adam Asnes of Lingoport and Andres Heuberger of ForeignExchange Translations sat down over a cup of coffee and discussed how one can expect to see a return on investment after internationalization and how i18n can be utilized by the medical field. It is interesting to note that the medical field is one of the last fields to be internationalized due to liability issues.

 

Lingoport Webinar: Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4

There is tremendous value in knowing if a product is global-ready as part of your development cycle. Large amounts of development, marketing and branding dollars are at stake. Yet often, the only way software gets verified for localization, is during the localization process itself, or based on a limited series of manual interface testing. That’s way too late in the development cycle to be efficient and a very incomplete way to address the issue.

There are all kinds of products to support issues like software security and efficiency, but how about checking on internationalization, which for many companies is a hefty and vital product requirement for a good share of company revenue?

In this webinar, we’ll be demonstrating how Globalyzer 3.4 (our new release) finds, categorizes, tracks and helps fix internationalization bugs in source code using static analysis.

Webinar: “Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4”
Date: Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
Time:
11am – Noon PST
Where:
Your desktop
Register at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/245577129
Cost: ComplimentaryPresenters: Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport

We’ll start with some source code and then:

  • Analyze it for internationalization issues
  • Customize “rule-sets” so that specific issues to that code can be address
  • Show how that information can be accessed and shared among development team members
  • Integrate automated Globalyzer static analysis via command line
  • Support testing initiatives

The Webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and localization challenges.

Note: We’ll be diving straight into coding issues and will be skipping internationalization basics. If you’re looking for a presentation on internationalization and localization basics, please visit this archived presentation from Localization World: http://vimeo.com/16345751

About the presenters:
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development.

Olivier Libouban, a native of France, has been working for 25 years in the software industry, for large corporations and start-ups, as a software engineer and as a project manager. Olivier has a wide ranging experience in the US, France, Switzerland, and Norway, in R&D departments as well as for client projects of all sizes with complex software environments.