Debunking the Hispanic Technology-Use Stereotype

In a recent interview by eMarketer with Marla Skiko, Director of Digital Innovation of SMG Multicultural, we discover that the Hispanic market is in fact thriving as a technology market, refuting the myth that the demographic are typically late adopters of technology.

There are a number of assumptions companies make when honing in on the Hispanic market when it comes to technology and tech products; many of which are mere myths that, when uncovered, reveal a thriving market. The value Hispanics place on their heritage is an essential understanding to how they engage online. Hispanic families are typically larger and very open with each other. This cultural knack for openness and sharing lends itself nicely to social media, and as Skiko states in her interview, “With Latinas, when you create something that’s relevant, it becomes a part of their life, it’s what they’re interested in.” The next step is where marketers come in and join the conversation. Skiko also states that not only does the same technology trendsetter status (especially with younger users) appeal to the Hispanic market as it does many other markets, but emerging technologies like mobile phones and voice-over IP are more cost effective. There’s no point to use a landline when only one person can use it at a time!

There are perceptions that Hispanics are typically late adopters of technology and aren’t frequenters of the Internet. These perceptions, as Skiko says, are false, and there is research to prove it. Marketers aren’t looking in the right places and aren’t taking the necessary time to understand the Hispanic consumer. If marketers and advertisers “bring them relevant content and reach out to them with messages that resonate,” then they will find success.

For the full article, please visit http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008592

We recently held a webinar on culturalizing your company’s brand. For information specific on culturalizing for Hispanic markets, view the recording here and start at the 48:25 mark: http://vimeo.com/28169868

 

 

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Webinar Recording: Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Last week we held a webinar on justifying the globalization of software to management and received a great deal of interest.  Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel joined Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport for an informative one-hour discussion on the specifics of how to clearly communicate the needs for software internationalization.

Key points of the presentation

  • Business case for i18n
  • Development hurdles
  • Costs: opportunity costs & product costs
  • What happens without i18n?
  • 30-minute question & answer session: what does Intel do for internationalization?

Webinar Recording: Product Brand Culturalization

Exposing your brand in the correct, culturalized form is an essential first step in success in foreign markets. We recently held a webinar on Product Brand Culturalization to help companies grasp the strategies needed to reap a significant ROI in foreign markets. Thank you to all who attended.

Google High-Quality Sites Algorithm Launched in Additional Languages

Originally posted on the Google Webmaster Central Blog 

Google, of late, has been placing an emphasis on returning more high-quality sites to users. Initially, this was a change for searches in English, but Google recently announced they’re including their search improvements for different languages. With an increase in internet use from non-English speakers in recent years, this effort by Google makes sense.

I wrote previously about Google’s internationalization efforts, and this just goes as further evidence that Google is taking its global initiatives seriously. Features previously available only in the US are becoming more and more available to international users, which is a good thing.

Google also noted that they are waiting to launch the high-quality search algorithm in Chinese, Japanese and Korean, where they continue to run tests on their improvements.

Things change fast. This Google Webmaster video was posted just days prior to the international release…

Product Brand Culturalization

Join us for an upcoming webinar on on Thursday, August 25 on adapting your product and brand for specific cultures and markets. Presented by localization and internationalization veterans Talia Baruch and Chris Raulf, this presentation will discuss the challenges that companies take on when moving their brand to a global market. Through their experiences, Baruch and Raulf have developed a deep understanding of what it takes to develop a great relationship between a brand and the needs of the global marketplace.

Registration

Webinar: “Product Brand Culturalization”
Date and Time: Thursday, August 25 at 11am PT / Noon MT / 1pm CT / 2pm ET
Registration: Register for free @ https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/642793497
Where: Your desktop
Presenters: Talia Baruch, Localization & Culturalization Consultant, Copyous and Chris Raulf, Marketing Director, Lingoport

This presentation targets business managers, marketing managers, product managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone else wanting to learn more about the product localization, internationalization, and culturalization process.

For more detailed information, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/webinars/product-brand-culturalization/

The Challenges of Bidirectional Languages

With the emergence of western relations with the Middle East, emphasis on bidirectionalization (sometimes written as b18n or BiDi) of web applications has increased in recent years. In basic terms, bidirectional languages contain text from multiple alphabets and content written in both left-to-right and right-to-left forms.

This past February, Roozbeh Pournader, an internationalization expert at HighTech Passport, spoke on this issue and offered a number of insights and ideas as to how to overcome bidirectional hurdles within software internationalization and localization. You can see a screen shot from the presentation to the right where some bidirectional issues are explored (notice the sentence structure). Pournader touches on the fact that in order to localize your application into a bidirectional language, you basically have to hack your own program; it isn’t easy. But when looked at in the right light, bidirectionalization is an opportunity to enter a new market and gain trust with a new group. It’s just part of the internationalization and localization process; do it right the first time and you’ll be rewarded.

Roozbeh Pournader’s talk focuses on the common problems of bidirectionalization, current approaches taken by the industry, and gives suggestions for avoiding headaches while providing some examples of bidirectionalization for web apps.

Also, be sure to read up on bidirectionalization with a great whitepaper from Enlaso: http://www.enlaso.com/Language_Tech_Center/White_Papers/Content/103_Arabic_and_Bidirectional_Challenges.pdf

Can Internationalization be Pursued Within Your Own Country?

At the root of the word internationalization is the word international, implying that internationalization is strictly a foreign endeavor. This, however, is a common misconception. In the 2010 Census, over 50 million people indicated they were of Latino or Hispanic origin (16.3% of the total US population), of which roughly 50% identifies itself as having limited English skills, meaning that there are important considerations to make for companies in  marketing and branding efforts. Part of these efforts, of course, are involved in the localization of products and content for different locales (including different locales in your own back yard).

Localization sells in such a way that most businesses have yet to grasp. People are most comfortable buying in a language that they understand, so businesses need to take advantage of the emerging buying power of non-English speakers.  Ideas? Prepare your website for new locales or write your site in a clear, concise voice so that it can be more easily translated by an automatic service like Google Translate.

In the coming weeks I will touch on other ways companies can capitalize on emerging locales. Stay tuned!