Internationalization and Medical Translations

Recently, Adam Asnes of Lingoport and Andres Heuberger of ForeignExchange Translations sat down over a cup of coffee and discussed how one can expect to see a return on investment after internationalization and how i18n can be utilized by the medical field. It is interesting to note that the medical field is one of the last fields to be internationalized due to liability issues.

 

Foreign Exchange Software Localization Roundtable

Please note that the Foreign Exchange Software Localization Roundtable has been rescheduled for another date. We will provide an update with the new date when we are provided with that information.

On Wednesday March 23, Marita Hoeh, Software Localization Manager for CaridianBCT, will conduct a presentation about the best software localization practices. The presentation will include a discussion about the upcoming challenges for software localization and a case study on CaridianBCT. The event starts at 8:30am at the Renaissance Boulder FlatIron Hotel in Broomfield, CO and will conclude at 11am. Breakfast will be provided as guests will be given a chance to network before the formal presentation begins at 9am.

Marita Hoeh has been working in the localization industry for the past 20 years, formerly specializing in translations for the medical field.

CaridianBCT is a software localization company specialized in medical devices based out of Lakewood, CO.  Hoeh created the software localization department where today she manages the software localization of all products.

Lingoport’s Adam Asnes will also be in attendance to provide his internationalization (i18n) and globalization expertise. Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001, and has since become an authority on internationalization and globalization of software.

Webinar Recording: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Lingoport recently hosted a Webinar with our friends from ForeignExchange Translations, a leading provider of medical translation and localization services.

Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Jason Heaton, Marketing Manager at Foreign Exchange Translations, discussed basic principles and processes that make medical products different

This interactive online presentation focused on providing attendees with a wealth of medical internationalization and localization knowledge. Adam and Jason discussed product architectures, testing and solutions to verify functional and linguistic accuracy; they also took an in-depth look at:

We recorded the live Webinar and you may view the recording at your leisure right on your desktop.

Click the following link to view the recording of: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Lingoport and Foreign Exchange Translations Webinar: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Internationalization and localization for medical products tends to have special case business drivers and can take on life-and-death importance. First, there’s adapting products for better worldwide sales, but often issues like reducing liabilities and saving lives drive the process just a bit differently.

Join us for an interactive one-hour online presentation as Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations, discuss basic principles and processes that make medical products different.

Webinar: “Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application”
Date: Thursday, December 16th, 2010
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PT
Where: Your desktop
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/242816048
Cost: Complimentary
Presenters: Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations

We’ll discuss product architectures, testing and solutions to verify functional and linguistic accuracy; we’ll also take an in-depth look at:

This event targets global manufacturers of medical device, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and healthcare products, including: localization managers, internationalization managers, software developers, engineers, engineering managers, information developers, and senior executives responsible for international market share as well as customer-side professionals involved in the translation and localization of medical and life sciences content.

Not Just Software. Medical Device Software.

Guest Blog post by Andres Heuberger, CEO and Founder of ForeignExchange Translations.

While any software localization can be challenging, medical device software adds yet another layer of complexity to the equation. This complexity comes from the fact that software is so integral to the functioning and therapy of a device that is keeping a person alive. Regulators are acknowledging this and device companies have to deal with new rules and new challenges.

Software Localization, Internationalization, and TranslationWith the advent of the new Medical Device Directive (MDD) amended by Directive 2007/47/EC and implemented six months ago, software is now included in the definition of a medical device. It does not matter whether the software is integrated into the actual device or is a stand-alone product. Software validation will also be an Essential Requirement (ER 12.1a) under the MDD. Annex I, Essential Requirement 12.1 has been amended to include that software must be validated, taking into account the principles of development lifecycle, risk management, validation and verification. In this context, proper software internationalization is even more important.

Software code needs to be able to handle different characters such as diacritical marks, as well as user inputs. User prompts need to be unambiguous and clear, especially since the prompts can be presented at times of user stress and emergency situations. Some device companies have started to use cognitive debriefing techniques which were, until now, reserved for the validation of pharmaceutical patient-reported outcomes, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of software interfaces. Having to carry this out in multiple languages and geographies can complicate development projects, not to mention the costs involved. On the translation side of medical device software, there is a narrow skill set for linguists, who must be able to translate software strings out of context, understand medical terminology and, in many cases, be savvy enough to test localized software on different platforms.

All is not bleak though. The companies who are most successful with their software localization are the ones who build projects specifications with localization in mind from the start and who lean on their translation providers for support from project inception through to final testing. It’s a brave new world, and medical device companies have no choice but to embrace it and understand the regulations and implications while devising new ways of working.

ForeignExchange Translations provides specialized medical translation and localization solutions to pharmaceutical and medical device companies. For more information, visit www.fxtrans.com.