Survey on Software Localization

A call for participation has been announced for a survey from the University of West London that examines the interoperation of software development and localization processes and its influence on the quality and development effort. It is geared toward those that have participated in the creation of software for international markets, including websites. The survey is open until December 25, 2011.

The survey is available at: http://samsa.uwl.ac.uk/locdevsurvey/index.php?sid=75766&lang=en

Webinar Recording: Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Last week we held a webinar on justifying the globalization of software to management and received a great deal of interest.  Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel joined Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport for an informative one-hour discussion on the specifics of how to clearly communicate the needs for software internationalization.

Key points of the presentation

  • Business case for i18n
  • Development hurdles
  • Costs: opportunity costs & product costs
  • What happens without i18n?
  • 30-minute question & answer session: what does Intel do for internationalization?

Upcoming Webinar: Justifying Software Internationalization to Management

The business case for internationalization is clear: companies have to sell to customers who are buying –> international customers present good buying opportunities –> products must be adapted to sell to international customers. Great, grand, wonderful (no yelling on the bus)! It all sounds so easy, doesn’t it? Well if it were all so easy, we would be spending 50 weeks per year on vacation and two weeks per year working. This is not the case.

Companies get bogged down in discussing costs, implementation and justification of all things, including internationalization. This inspired us to develop a webinar on how to justify internationalization to management. We have heard questions from customers about how the lack of a definitive i18n/L10n process is slowing their department down, but they don’t have the numbers, the raw data to quantify the use of tools to aid the process.

The webinar is free of charge, more info:

Adam will discuss a number of topics, including:

  • How would management be affected if you failed to meet quarterly expectations internationally due to a lack of understanding between developers and localization caused by an unclear i18n/L10n process?
  • How much time (and money) is spent on bug fixing? And what exactly is an i18n bug?
  • How to create an internationalization plan.
  • How to lower overall cost by establishing a stable QA process.
  • How to managing the internationalization process.
  • How to present numbers and strategies to management in a clear and concise manner, and much more.
If you are unable to attend, a recording of the webinar will be made available following the event. Follow @Lingoport to receive updates.

Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Why can’t software developers, designers, project managers & quality assurance all just get along?

We recently held a webinar on Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization, but I think this image was all we needed to show…

Thanks to GlobalNerdy.com for sharing this

Internationalization Software Globalyzer 3.6 Release

The latest Globalyzer Release Features new Programming Languages, new Rule Sets, Additional Support to Help Software Development Teams Share the String Externalization Work, and an Internationalization Scorecard

Lingoport, a provider of i18n tools and internationalization consulting services, announced yesterday the release of Globalyzer 3.6. Lingoport also announced that it will participate in an online panel presentation along with Zynga, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, to discuss software development and localization on Wednesday, August 3rd.

Globalyzer—a client/server software internationalization system—assists development teams in internationalizing source code as an integral part of future releases. Globalyzer finds, fixes, and monitors issues quickly so that software applications are ready for localization and worldwide customer requirements.

The latest Globalyzer release features many new enhancements, including new supported programming languages: Qt and ActionScript plus enhanced XML and MXML support. Globalyzer 3.6 also adds shared string externalization support to help development teams working together on internationalization efforts as well as an internationalization scorecard, enabling managers to track key internationalization metrics over time.

Adam Asnes, founder and CEO of Lingoport, notes: “We are very excited to announce that Globalyzer is further extending support for programming languages like ActionScript, used in Flex and Flash applications, and enterprise global readiness analysis that we’ve seen become more important among our customers. We also keep adding features to help teams of developers support internationalization, as that’s an endeavor that runs across teams rather than just individual developers.” He continues: “More than ever, Globalyzer assures that a software application is global-ready as part of the development cycle, thus enabling companies to enter new markets faster while raising quality and lowering worldwide development, translation, and support costs.”

Lingoport’s software i18n tool now also features an internationalization scorecard. The scorecard system provides a dashboard of internationalization status and progress using XML data collected via scan history using Globalyzer’s Command Line. The i18n scorecard was recently discussed in an hour-long webinar presentation and featured guest-speakers Mike McKenna, Sr. Manager, International Engineering, from Zynga, and Leandro Reis, Senior Globalization Program Manager, from Adobe Systems. A recording of the presentation may be viewed at: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-webinar-video/#17

The Globalyzer 3.6 release notes are available on Lingoport’s website at:http://www.lingoport.com/software-internationalization-products/globalyzer-3/release-notes/

A Robotic Introduction to Bridging the Gap between Software Development and Localization

So, you’ve developed a new software application, and have high aspirations in terms of selling your application to a global audience. Now what? Problems often arise between developers, localization managers, and business managers due to perceived lack of support, time, and money.

This lack of understanding can lead to great frustration within the development tiers. Join us for an hour long online panel discussion and learn how some of the best known industry thought leaders are contributing to bridging the gap between software development and localization.

Join us Wednesday, August 3rd at 9:30am PT for a discussion led by a panel of experts on Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization. Registration is available at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

Upcoming Webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization

Mister Zebra and Miss Giraffe introduce you to Lingoport’s next webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization.

This webinar will feature a panel of software development, internationalization and localization professionals and will be held on Wednesday, August 3rd at 12:30pm EDT.

Technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, technical writers, content developers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to optimize their global software releases are encouraged to attend.

Sign up here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

Localized & Free Software Key to Chinese Breakthrough

This post is a summary of an article on ZDNet posted on June 2, 2011. Link to the full article is available below.

Recent analysis by Chinese Market Research’s (CMR) business analyst Irene Yu suggests that it is vital for software companies and developers to localize before porting their products over to Chinese markets. Yu also adds that there are a number of cultural differences that western companies need to consider.  Chinese consumers interact differently on the web than do western consumers as they are more likely to share their opinions and experiences of a product or brand. Due to this, simple translation of software isn’t enough to introducing a new product in China; cultural tendencies need to be explored and accounted for.

Additionally, demand in China for paid software continues to grow; however, many Chinese consumers prefer a free version of a product in which they can pay for add ons later: users often like to check the quality of a product before purchasing the full version. A problem arises, though, with the availability of pirated/cracked software in China. To make up for this, companies looking to grow in China are providing the basic version of their software for free, with paid add ins. The best model for this is the integration of Plants vs. Zombies, a free social game in which users can purchase virtual goods.

For the full version of this article posted June 2, 2011 on ZDNet, visit http://www.zdnetasia.com/free-localization-key-to-china-breakthrough-62300567.htm

New Generation Digital Book on iPad

Ted Talks is a great place to learn and be inspired about new and upcoming ideas. Books in their hard form are being phased out for digital counterparts. Up until now, books have been static, as in they are just a series of words, sentences and paragraphs. Software developer Mike Matas has developed an interactive reading experience on the iPad, full of pictures, videos and yes, words to create a whole new interactive book experience. Check it out below!

Keep Score of Your Internationalization Efforts

Those in the localization industry have become more aware of the importance of internationalization as a part of their overall globalization efforts. Software internationalization in particular can be difficult to articulate and efforts can be prone to errors without the proper help.

Lingoport has come across a number of companies that have issues with tracking the status of their internationalization efforts, resulting in hindered global development cycles. A delay in internationalization is compounded to further delays down the road in releasing products in new locales. Such delays cost companies in terms of their bottom line.

To help businesses fight this problem, Lingoport has developed a score card mechanism within Globalyzer to help development teams find, fix and monitor internationalization issues. The score card can be tailored to the specific needs of each development team and be used in a number of programming languages.

Join us for a free webinar on Thursday, June 16 at 10am EDT (3pm GMT) and 2pm EDT as Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport review the i18n score card specifics and discuss:

  • The Internationalization Score Card setup and analyst input.
  • Using Globalyzer in the Internationalization Score Card.
  • The Internationalization Score Card utilities.
  • A workflow to integrate the Internationalization Score Card in a continuous integration environment, and more.

The webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and internationalization challenges.

Registration is free and is available at:

This webinar was inspired by a discussion at last March’s Worldware Conference where Adobe, Autodesk and Yahoo! held a panel on how they are tackling the problem of measuring globalization compliance. The video and description are viewable at http://i18nblog.com/2011/03/28/worldware-presentation-i18n-assessments/

Top Ten Internationalization Mistakes to Avoid

This is a summary of an article written by Adam Asnes of Lingoport. For the full article, visit http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes 

Sometimes the best way to learn is through mistakes you have made in the past. While this may be true in the personal arena, making mistakes in business is costly. Lingoport has seen a number of internationalization mistakes cost companies money in the past. Here’s a list of the top ten problems businesses looking at internationalization need to realize.

  1. Don’t forget what drives internationalization: new customers in new markets
  2. Don’t assume internationalization is just an older software legacy issue: no framework, however new, is capable of internationalizing itself.
  3. Don’t assume you can treat internationalization like any other feature improvement when it comes to source control management.
  4. Don’t assume internationalization is just a string externalization exercise: the scope of i18n is much greater.
  5. Don’t wing it on locale: be sure to consider both language and location.
  6. Don’t create your very own internationalization framework: speak to somebody who has done it before.
  7. Don’t think that the team internationalizing your software can work without a working build: developers should be able to test as they go.
  8. Don’t run out of money: projects suffer from underscoping, resulting in costly release delays.
  9. Don’t use a half thought-out character encoding strategy: use Unicode.
  10. Don’t use your same testing plan, or just rely on localization testing, when your functional testing needs to grow to include internationalization requirements.

For full details, read the full article here: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes

The Circular Path of I18n, Localization, Testing and Internationalization

The internationalization process is often thought of as a one-time event that can be undertaken to be successful in a global market. This thought, however, is not the case. It’s true that i18n is a front-loaded process, but, as successful global vendors know, development is a cycle; everything needs to be revisited and refined to ensure new updates are indeed, internationalization ready. This presentation from last March’s Worldware conference goes over the internationalization process and discusses what companies can expect when implementing an i18n strategy.

Presented by:

Worldware: Software Static Analysis

This presentation from Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport progresses from beginning an internationalization plan to actually implementing that effort. There’s a big difference in describing the process of externalizing Unicode strings and actually doing it through an executable plan. This four-part presentation will dive into using internationalization static analysis using Globalyzer while looking over the metrics for success in such a project.

Part 1: The business case for internationalization, character encoding, a Java internationalization example and an overview of Globalyzer’s static analysis.

You may also view this presentation on Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/Lingoport/wordware-2011-lingoporti18nplanningstaticanalysis

Part 2: Requirements in i18n software engineering, locale and code architecture analysis: http://www.youtube.com/i18n analysis part 2

Part 3: An example of how Globalyzer is used: http://www.youtube.com/i18n analysis part 3

Part 4: An internationalization project plan: http://www.youtube.com/i18n analysis part 4

Unicode: the Movie

Programmers and developers recognize Unicode as a superset of characters from nearly every language in the world and as a necessary standard to oblige to.  Unicode represents a set of of over 109,000 characters. While that number is impressive, the visual representation of that many characters is simply astounding. I came across a video on YouTube that flashes one Unicode character per frame; it lasts over 30 minutes. Watch the video for about 30 seconds, and you’ll get the idea.

Also, Lingoport‘s Adam Asnes shares how Unicode came into being and how it is a valuable tool for developers to develop in other languages.