Survey on Software Localization

A call for participation has been announced for a survey from the University of West London that examines the interoperation of software development and localization processes and its influence on the quality and development effort. It is geared toward those that have participated in the creation of software for international markets, including websites. The survey is open until December 25, 2011.

The survey is available at: http://samsa.uwl.ac.uk/locdevsurvey/index.php?sid=75766&lang=en

Internationalization of Cisco’s TelePresence – Case Study

Republished from Lingoport.com

About Cisco TelePresence

Cisco TelePresence, which debuted in 2006, is an advanced video conferencing system developed by Cisco Systems. Designed to link together conference rooms at any two points in the world, TelePresence provides a 1080p video feed along with spatial audio, creating a virtual conference room.

Scope of Work

Cisco initially hired Lingoport to audit TelePresence source code for internationalization (i18n) issues in order to avoid potential costly issues before moving on to localization (L10n). Through a static analysis of the TelePresence code using Globalyzer—a client/server software internationalization system—Lingoport was able to establish a clear picture of the internationalization issues and create a well-defined path toward internationalization. This avoided the uncertain trial and error outcome of relying on iterative testing, script-based searching or human line-by-line review, which are slow, incomplete and error prone processes. With this understanding, Lingoport architects and Cisco engineering discussed best alternatives for an internationalization architectural approach, and built plans that accommodated release cycles for concurrent i18n and new feature development. Cisco then contracted with Lingoport to implement internationalization development and testing services.

Challenges

Though there had been initial efforts in some of the code to support internationalization, there was a large effort needed. TelePresence included several distinct application components, including multiple programming languages as well as sophisticated hardware and build environments. Concurrent product development was extremely active. A nearly year-long project plan was developed to support the release of TelePresence into 28 languages, and a number of additional locales. This plan was implemented within a busy development, testing and release schedule that had already been set.

In order to maintain the original development schedule and implement a robust internationalization plan, teams were augmented and allowed to branch off and work on their piece of the code.

The Lingoport Solution

Through the use of Lingoport’s Globalyzer i18n software, the teams were able to itemize and walk developers through code refactoring efforts. This facilitated tasks such as string externalization and changing methods/functions/classes and programming patterns that inhibited or prevented locale support requirements. Globalyzer also made the effort more scalable as developers had a clear path of action and utilities to speed up the process. Lingoport’s engineering team added internationalization support to the architecture and refactored code to support worldwide locale requirements. Additionally, when Cisco engineering added new code and features to the build,  it was checked using Globalyzer for new i18n issues. Internationalization criteria were added to testing protocols and functionality was assured. Lingoport and Cisco also coordinated with localization efforts so that L10n testing could be integrated with i18n functional testing, without delay.

For the full article, as well as the recording to the webinar Internationalizing and Localizing Cisco’s Telepresence – a Case Study, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/software-internationalization-clients/i18n-l10n-of-cisco-telepresence/

Lingoport & Acrolinx to Host Expert Panel Discussion on Leading Globalized Software Development

Presentation and Panel Discussion Features Industry Thought Leaders from Cisco, Intel, Rearden Commerce, Acrolinx, Lingoport, and GlobalPragmatica

BOULDER, CO – September 20, 2011 – Lingoport, a leading provider of software internationalization (i18n) tools and i18n consulting services, announced today that it will co-host with Acrolinx, the world’s leading provider of Information Quality Management software, a special event on the eve of Localization World in Santa Clara on Monday, October 10th starting at 2:30pm.

The event features Tex Texin, Chief Globalization Architect at Rearden Commerce, Andrew Bredenkamp, CEO at Acrolinx, Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel, Richard Faubert, Manager, Software Development QA at Cisco, and Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport. Erin Vang, owner of GlobalPragmatica, will be moderating the panel discussion.

Adam Asnes, President & CEO at Lingoport, notes, “We were able to assemble an expert group of industry veterans who will be sharing many of their own best practices and also discuss strategies that contribute to leading globalized software development at their respective companies. We’re all looking forward to hosting a very dynamic session and hope to answer many of the audiences’ questions.”

In an interactive presentation and panel format, these industry experts will present and discuss

  • Developing software for the world
  • Closing the loop between internationalization (i18n) and localization (L10n)
  • Content authoring with localization in mind
  • Measuring software development for globalization
  • How to justify and gaining approval for software globalization (i18n and L10n) from management
  • Measuring ROI on your globalization projects
  • Agile software development and i18n & L10n, and much more

The event is open to customer-side internationalization, localization, and globalization managers, software developers and engineers, content developers, and anyone interested in understanding and promoting the software globalization process and the effects i18n and L10 have on an organization as a whole.

For additional information and to register, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/training-events/leading-globalized-software-development-i18n-l10n/ or contact Chris Raulf at craulf@lingoport.com or call 303.444. 0637.

Lingoport also announces that it recently hosted a webinar presentation on justifying software globalization to management. The webinar featured guest-speaker Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel and is now available for playback at:http://www.lingoport.com/webinars/justifying-software-globalization-management/.

About Lingoport (www.lingoport.com)
Lingoport helps globally focused technology companies adapt their software for worldwide markets with expert internationalization and localization consulting and Globalyzer software.
Globalyzer, a market leading software internationalization tool, helps entire enterprises and development teams to effectively internationalize existing and newly developed source code and to prepare their applications for localization.

For more information, please visit http://www.lingoport.com or http://www.globalyzer.com or contact Lingoport at +1 303 444 8020 orinfo@lingoport.com.

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Webinar Recording: Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Last week we held a webinar on justifying the globalization of software to management and received a great deal of interest.  Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel joined Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport for an informative one-hour discussion on the specifics of how to clearly communicate the needs for software internationalization.

Key points of the presentation

  • Business case for i18n
  • Development hurdles
  • Costs: opportunity costs & product costs
  • What happens without i18n?
  • 30-minute question & answer session: what does Intel do for internationalization?

Upcoming Webinar: Justifying Software Internationalization to Management

The business case for internationalization is clear: companies have to sell to customers who are buying –> international customers present good buying opportunities –> products must be adapted to sell to international customers. Great, grand, wonderful (no yelling on the bus)! It all sounds so easy, doesn’t it? Well if it were all so easy, we would be spending 50 weeks per year on vacation and two weeks per year working. This is not the case.

Companies get bogged down in discussing costs, implementation and justification of all things, including internationalization. This inspired us to develop a webinar on how to justify internationalization to management. We have heard questions from customers about how the lack of a definitive i18n/L10n process is slowing their department down, but they don’t have the numbers, the raw data to quantify the use of tools to aid the process.

The webinar is free of charge, more info:

Adam will discuss a number of topics, including:

  • How would management be affected if you failed to meet quarterly expectations internationally due to a lack of understanding between developers and localization caused by an unclear i18n/L10n process?
  • How much time (and money) is spent on bug fixing? And what exactly is an i18n bug?
  • How to create an internationalization plan.
  • How to lower overall cost by establishing a stable QA process.
  • How to managing the internationalization process.
  • How to present numbers and strategies to management in a clear and concise manner, and much more.
If you are unable to attend, a recording of the webinar will be made available following the event. Follow @Lingoport to receive updates.

Google High-Quality Sites Algorithm Launched in Additional Languages

Originally posted on the Google Webmaster Central Blog 

Google, of late, has been placing an emphasis on returning more high-quality sites to users. Initially, this was a change for searches in English, but Google recently announced they’re including their search improvements for different languages. With an increase in internet use from non-English speakers in recent years, this effort by Google makes sense.

I wrote previously about Google’s internationalization efforts, and this just goes as further evidence that Google is taking its global initiatives seriously. Features previously available only in the US are becoming more and more available to international users, which is a good thing.

Google also noted that they are waiting to launch the high-quality search algorithm in Chinese, Japanese and Korean, where they continue to run tests on their improvements.

Things change fast. This Google Webmaster video was posted just days prior to the international release…

Product Brand Culturalization

Join us for an upcoming webinar on on Thursday, August 25 on adapting your product and brand for specific cultures and markets. Presented by localization and internationalization veterans Talia Baruch and Chris Raulf, this presentation will discuss the challenges that companies take on when moving their brand to a global market. Through their experiences, Baruch and Raulf have developed a deep understanding of what it takes to develop a great relationship between a brand and the needs of the global marketplace.

Registration

Webinar: “Product Brand Culturalization”
Date and Time: Thursday, August 25 at 11am PT / Noon MT / 1pm CT / 2pm ET
Registration: Register for free @ https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/642793497
Where: Your desktop
Presenters: Talia Baruch, Localization & Culturalization Consultant, Copyous and Chris Raulf, Marketing Director, Lingoport

This presentation targets business managers, marketing managers, product managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone else wanting to learn more about the product localization, internationalization, and culturalization process.

For more detailed information, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/webinars/product-brand-culturalization/

Internationalization Software Globalyzer 3.6 Release

The latest Globalyzer Release Features new Programming Languages, new Rule Sets, Additional Support to Help Software Development Teams Share the String Externalization Work, and an Internationalization Scorecard

Lingoport, a provider of i18n tools and internationalization consulting services, announced yesterday the release of Globalyzer 3.6. Lingoport also announced that it will participate in an online panel presentation along with Zynga, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, to discuss software development and localization on Wednesday, August 3rd.

Globalyzer—a client/server software internationalization system—assists development teams in internationalizing source code as an integral part of future releases. Globalyzer finds, fixes, and monitors issues quickly so that software applications are ready for localization and worldwide customer requirements.

The latest Globalyzer release features many new enhancements, including new supported programming languages: Qt and ActionScript plus enhanced XML and MXML support. Globalyzer 3.6 also adds shared string externalization support to help development teams working together on internationalization efforts as well as an internationalization scorecard, enabling managers to track key internationalization metrics over time.

Adam Asnes, founder and CEO of Lingoport, notes: “We are very excited to announce that Globalyzer is further extending support for programming languages like ActionScript, used in Flex and Flash applications, and enterprise global readiness analysis that we’ve seen become more important among our customers. We also keep adding features to help teams of developers support internationalization, as that’s an endeavor that runs across teams rather than just individual developers.” He continues: “More than ever, Globalyzer assures that a software application is global-ready as part of the development cycle, thus enabling companies to enter new markets faster while raising quality and lowering worldwide development, translation, and support costs.”

Lingoport’s software i18n tool now also features an internationalization scorecard. The scorecard system provides a dashboard of internationalization status and progress using XML data collected via scan history using Globalyzer’s Command Line. The i18n scorecard was recently discussed in an hour-long webinar presentation and featured guest-speakers Mike McKenna, Sr. Manager, International Engineering, from Zynga, and Leandro Reis, Senior Globalization Program Manager, from Adobe Systems. A recording of the presentation may be viewed at: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-webinar-video/#17

The Globalyzer 3.6 release notes are available on Lingoport’s website at:http://www.lingoport.com/software-internationalization-products/globalyzer-3/release-notes/

A Robotic Introduction to Bridging the Gap between Software Development and Localization

So, you’ve developed a new software application, and have high aspirations in terms of selling your application to a global audience. Now what? Problems often arise between developers, localization managers, and business managers due to perceived lack of support, time, and money.

This lack of understanding can lead to great frustration within the development tiers. Join us for an hour long online panel discussion and learn how some of the best known industry thought leaders are contributing to bridging the gap between software development and localization.

Join us Wednesday, August 3rd at 9:30am PT for a discussion led by a panel of experts on Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization. Registration is available at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

Upcoming Webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization

Mister Zebra and Miss Giraffe introduce you to Lingoport’s next webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization.

This webinar will feature a panel of software development, internationalization and localization professionals and will be held on Wednesday, August 3rd at 12:30pm EDT.

Technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, technical writers, content developers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to optimize their global software releases are encouraged to attend.

Sign up here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

i18n Scorecard Webinar Recording

Last week, we held a webinar in conjunction with Mike McKenna, the Senior Manager of International Engineering with Zynga and Leandro Reis, the Senior Globalization Program Manager with Adobe, on Lingoport’s new internationalization scorecard. We had great attendance from a wide variety of industry professionals and thank all of you who attended.

Upcoming i18n Scorecard Webinar to Include Senior Manager at Zynga

We’re very happy to announce that our internationalization scorecard webinar on Thursday, June 16 will feature guest speaker Mike McKenna, Senior Manager of International Engineering at Zynga. Zynga is a leader in social games including hit titles FarmVille and Mafia Wars.

Details of the webinar can be found at an old post, here: http://i18nblog.com/2011/05/24/internationalization-score-card-efforts/

The webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and internationalization challenges.

Registration is free and is available at:

This webinar was inspired by a discussion at last March’s Worldware Conference where Adobe, Autodesk and Yahoo! held a panel on how they are tackling the problem of measuring globalization compliance. The video and description are viewable at http://i18nblog.com/2011/03/28/worldware-presentation-i18n-assessments/

Keep Score of Your Internationalization Efforts

Those in the localization industry have become more aware of the importance of internationalization as a part of their overall globalization efforts. Software internationalization in particular can be difficult to articulate and efforts can be prone to errors without the proper help.

Lingoport has come across a number of companies that have issues with tracking the status of their internationalization efforts, resulting in hindered global development cycles. A delay in internationalization is compounded to further delays down the road in releasing products in new locales. Such delays cost companies in terms of their bottom line.

To help businesses fight this problem, Lingoport has developed a score card mechanism within Globalyzer to help development teams find, fix and monitor internationalization issues. The score card can be tailored to the specific needs of each development team and be used in a number of programming languages.

Join us for a free webinar on Thursday, June 16 at 10am EDT (3pm GMT) and 2pm EDT as Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport review the i18n score card specifics and discuss:

  • The Internationalization Score Card setup and analyst input.
  • Using Globalyzer in the Internationalization Score Card.
  • The Internationalization Score Card utilities.
  • A workflow to integrate the Internationalization Score Card in a continuous integration environment, and more.

The webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and internationalization challenges.

Registration is free and is available at:

This webinar was inspired by a discussion at last March’s Worldware Conference where Adobe, Autodesk and Yahoo! held a panel on how they are tackling the problem of measuring globalization compliance. The video and description are viewable at http://i18nblog.com/2011/03/28/worldware-presentation-i18n-assessments/

The Basics of Unicode

We’ve posted a number of things in the past about Unicode. From 30-minute epileptic movies to a brief Unicode introduction video (which has been one of our most popular YouTube videos), the subject has yielded great interest. I wanted to recycle an old article written by Lingoport President, Adam Asnes, as a sort of introduction to the basics of Unicode.

Unicode is essentially a global dictionary of tens of thousands of characters. It allows for companies to create applications and websites that are translatable and eliminate any need to redevelop the same site or app over and over again in a different language. Remember that when you boil down software, you reach the binary level of zeros and ones. This mapping of zeros and ones is what’s called character encoding. The issue arises when there are not enough zeros and ones to represent accented characters or the more complex characters of Chinese, Japanese and Korean. Unicode solves this problem by creating an extended character encoding map, creating a more manageable translation process. No longer are we in the bad old days when websites and applications based on different languages needed to be developed independently.

The full article, including a more technical approach, can be viewed here: http://www.lingoport.com/unicode-primer-for-the-uninitiated

Top Ten Internationalization Mistakes to Avoid

This is a summary of an article written by Adam Asnes of Lingoport. For the full article, visit http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes 

Sometimes the best way to learn is through mistakes you have made in the past. While this may be true in the personal arena, making mistakes in business is costly. Lingoport has seen a number of internationalization mistakes cost companies money in the past. Here’s a list of the top ten problems businesses looking at internationalization need to realize.

  1. Don’t forget what drives internationalization: new customers in new markets
  2. Don’t assume internationalization is just an older software legacy issue: no framework, however new, is capable of internationalizing itself.
  3. Don’t assume you can treat internationalization like any other feature improvement when it comes to source control management.
  4. Don’t assume internationalization is just a string externalization exercise: the scope of i18n is much greater.
  5. Don’t wing it on locale: be sure to consider both language and location.
  6. Don’t create your very own internationalization framework: speak to somebody who has done it before.
  7. Don’t think that the team internationalizing your software can work without a working build: developers should be able to test as they go.
  8. Don’t run out of money: projects suffer from underscoping, resulting in costly release delays.
  9. Don’t use a half thought-out character encoding strategy: use Unicode.
  10. Don’t use your same testing plan, or just rely on localization testing, when your functional testing needs to grow to include internationalization requirements.

For full details, read the full article here: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-management-mistakes

Internationalization and Canada

This is a summary of an article written by Adam Asnes of Lingoport for the September 2010 issue of Multilingual Computing Magazine.

Canada can serve as a valuable stepping stone for companies looking to take the first step towards global development. With minimal barriers for American companies to doing business in Canada and the strength of the Canadian dollar (allowing American exports to be cheaper), partnership opportunities are springing up everywhere.  Companies looking to sell in Canada can do so without overhauling their product, but they do need to consider a few differences. In terms of translation, there are a few words that need to be looked at since Canada is a new locale (language+location) such as “center” vs. “centre” and “color” vs. “colour.” While English translations are easy to identify, remember that Canada has two official languages: English and French. While my Canadian language law knowledge is no broader than this scene from Canadian Bacon, I do know that companies looking to do business with the whole of Canada or the Canadian government need to adapt their software to support French as well.

There are a few more internationalization issues to consider when adapting a product to a Canadian market. Most stem from entry of data: postal codes, shipping addresses and business logic. While internationalization is never easy, Canada does present a great opportunity to test i18n efforts. The proximity to the US, sharing of time zones and general lack of language barrier allow for easy communication allow for clients to simply pick up the phone and say, “Hey, is it working?” and get an immediate response. In this way, companies can springboard their internationalization efforts having the reassurance that their development strategy works.

For the full article, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-and-canada

Preparing an E-Commerce Site for a New Locale

This is a summary of an article on Lingoport.com from October 2009.

As I have shared in previous posts about localizing content for a specific locale, creating a website that works in multiple target locations is essential for creating an international business. If your company website sells to an international market or creates content that appeals to people around the world then it is important to communicate in a clear manner.

The process of preparing  a site can take time, but it is important to do it right the first time in order to save costs. Remember that simply translating a website into multiple languages doesn’t necessarily make it easier for international customers to use your site. There are differing date formats, currency formats, and address formats to consider; i.e.: England uses “postal codes” while the US uses “zip codes.” This difference is rather subtle, but as a company selling to international customers, it is important to be as clear and concise as possible throughout the purchasing process. This point brings up the difference between simply translating a site to multiple languages versus translating a site to multiple locales. Locales are more specific, obviously, and have their own purchasing behaviors.

On the more technical side, the architecture of the code in the back end of a site will likely need to be changed to support a new market. The process of internationalization extracting embedded code stings can more easily improve the process of translation, and ease the work load of software developers by cutting back the time it takes to search through lines and lines of code. Additionally, supporting the character set support Unicode offers will dismiss any mis-translated gibberish.

Now if you’re operating a smaller operation and consider machine translation, through Google Translate for example, then there are easily implementable strategies to consider when catering to an international audience. Using short, concise wording in your site’s content will help the machine translation better communicate your message. Additionally, when repeating the same idea, use the same phrase so that foreign readers can identify that you are talking about the same thing. Staying knowledgeable and up-to-date with your customers will go a long way in garnering success.

For the full article, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/building-a-site-for-worldwide-customers

Agile Challenges for Localization

This is a summary of an article written by Adam Asnes of Lingoport for the Jan./Feb. 2011 issue of Multilingual.

Agile development has changed the way that software has been developed and has yielded many positive results. Agile allows for development in short, three week sprints, resulting in more frequent product releases. It allows for companies to keep up and push the threshold of software development without dealing with all the administrative issues that can delay a release, often rendering a product obsolete since it is out-of-date. Undoubtedly, this leaves customers happy too as they get frequent updates and can stay up to speed on a weekly/monthly basis.

With rapid development becoming more popular in the international arena, developers using agile need a software analysis tool that can stay up to speed with frequent updates.  As part of the software development process, internationalization fits right in to agile development. Agile is a never-ending process of development and refinement, as is internationalization, so both go hand in hand when implementing an agile strategy.

Usually the final step in the development process, localization has been put on the back burner when it comes to software development. I think of it in terms of a ripple in a pond. The initial oscillations carry more momentum, are more powerful and are the most noticeable. As the oscillations spread out, they get weaker, have less momentum and are often overlooked. The initial splash in agile development is much more exciting and it often gets all the glory in terms of creating a great product. As that splash moves outward, there is less excitement as it spreads to new “locales.” What I’m getting at here, is that localization is somehow disconnected from agile development. Localization takes more time, and cannot be done in the same short intervals as development. There are more things to consider: which locales are best and how long do these customers have to wait to receive the latest version of the product. This disconnect cannot be solved, but there are ways to enhance the development process so businesses don’t waste too much time. Read the full article at http://www.lingoport.com/agile-challenges-for-localization

The Circular Path of I18n, Localization, Testing and Internationalization

The internationalization process is often thought of as a one-time event that can be undertaken to be successful in a global market. This thought, however, is not the case. It’s true that i18n is a front-loaded process, but, as successful global vendors know, development is a cycle; everything needs to be revisited and refined to ensure new updates are indeed, internationalization ready. This presentation from last March’s Worldware conference goes over the internationalization process and discusses what companies can expect when implementing an i18n strategy.

Presented by:

Case Study: Internationalizing & Localizing Cisco’s TelePresence

Designed to link together two rooms at any distance, Cisco’s TelePresence has been a valuable communication tool used to link companies across the world. The telecommunication system provides a high-definition video feed along with spacial audio to create a virtual conference room setting. Global in nature, Cisco’s TelePresence faced a number of internationalization and localization issues. Lingoport and localization experts Sajan stepped up to help Cisco face this challenge.

Join us for a free webinar at noon EDT on Thursday, May 19 as Richard Faubert, QA Manager at Cisco joins Adam Asnes of Lingoport and Gary Condon of Sajan to review and discuss the hurdles overcome by the three teams as they completed a successful implementation. The presenters will also discuss how i18n development, localization and testing was tightly integrated into Cisco’s development and QA process, producing better engineering and linguistic results.

Registration is free and is available here: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalizing-and-localizing-cisco-telepresence-a-case-study