Debunking the Hispanic Technology-Use Stereotype

In a recent interview by eMarketer with Marla Skiko, Director of Digital Innovation of SMG Multicultural, we discover that the Hispanic market is in fact thriving as a technology market, refuting the myth that the demographic are typically late adopters of technology.

There are a number of assumptions companies make when honing in on the Hispanic market when it comes to technology and tech products; many of which are mere myths that, when uncovered, reveal a thriving market. The value Hispanics place on their heritage is an essential understanding to how they engage online. Hispanic families are typically larger and very open with each other. This cultural knack for openness and sharing lends itself nicely to social media, and as Skiko states in her interview, “With Latinas, when you create something that’s relevant, it becomes a part of their life, it’s what they’re interested in.” The next step is where marketers come in and join the conversation. Skiko also states that not only does the same technology trendsetter status (especially with younger users) appeal to the Hispanic market as it does many other markets, but emerging technologies like mobile phones and voice-over IP are more cost effective. There’s no point to use a landline when only one person can use it at a time!

There are perceptions that Hispanics are typically late adopters of technology and aren’t frequenters of the Internet. These perceptions, as Skiko says, are false, and there is research to prove it. Marketers aren’t looking in the right places and aren’t taking the necessary time to understand the Hispanic consumer. If marketers and advertisers “bring them relevant content and reach out to them with messages that resonate,” then they will find success.

For the full article, please visit http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008592

We recently held a webinar on culturalizing your company’s brand. For information specific on culturalizing for Hispanic markets, view the recording here and start at the 48:25 mark: http://vimeo.com/28169868

 

 

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Can Internationalization be Pursued Within Your Own Country?

At the root of the word internationalization is the word international, implying that internationalization is strictly a foreign endeavor. This, however, is a common misconception. In the 2010 Census, over 50 million people indicated they were of Latino or Hispanic origin (16.3% of the total US population), of which roughly 50% identifies itself as having limited English skills, meaning that there are important considerations to make for companies in  marketing and branding efforts. Part of these efforts, of course, are involved in the localization of products and content for different locales (including different locales in your own back yard).

Localization sells in such a way that most businesses have yet to grasp. People are most comfortable buying in a language that they understand, so businesses need to take advantage of the emerging buying power of non-English speakers.  Ideas? Prepare your website for new locales or write your site in a clear, concise voice so that it can be more easily translated by an automatic service like Google Translate.

In the coming weeks I will touch on other ways companies can capitalize on emerging locales. Stay tuned!