World Gaming Executive Magazine Launch

The gaming community recently saw the release of a comprehensive digital magazine targeting world gaming executives and providing in-depth articles for the those in all facets of the gaming community. Below is an excerpt from World Gaming Executives Director John Armstrong:

Great news on the launch of World Gaming Executives Magazine WGE:MAG just 2 weeks ago. Since that time, there have been over 2500 downloads, the number of daily visitors to www.worldgamingexecutives.com has doubled and one particular article in the magazine has been picked up by dozens of gaming magazines including Eurogamer (and translated into 6 languages -that we know of).

Not seen the magazine yet? Take a look here:
http://www.worldgamingexecutives.com/page/articles-2

An interesting idea shared in the magazine is that of grabbing your audiences attention. No matter what business you’re in, your goal is to earn attention from your customers, both current and potential. Without attention there is no business. Brands have been jumping on the gaming trend to further increase their interaction with customers. Zynga, for example, has created its own virtual economy where users can purchase upgrades for their games and advertisers can target specific users. This must be done subtly, however, as gamers don’t like clunky in-your-face ads.

But where is the next wave of attention coming from? With the emergence of more developed and sophisticated users internationally, it’s hard to ignore the emerging opportunities to globalize social and mobile games. To learn more about these trends, and the projected value of adapting games to new locales, I encourage you to read Social & Mobile Apps and Globalization – Confessions of a g11n Veteran 


Sign up for an interactive webinar on December 1st at 11am PST on how to take your mobile games and apps global

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Trends in Mobile & Social Applications

The global marketplace is booming for online games, social & mobile games and applications. We have been working with Danica Brinton of LocLabs –a heralded “rock star” in the social/mobile space– recently, and are delighted that she shared some of her insight with us.

Abstract from Social & Mobile Apps and Globalization

There is a level of instant gratification seen from the localization of social games unseen in comparison to software, handhelds, CPU’s, search and web services. This stems from the viral nature of the social-gaming sphere where users are inclined to share games that they enjoy and want to play with friends. Often overlooked, however is that 75% of Facebook users come from outside the US and most prominent social games have over 70% of their user base and 50% of their revenue coming from locales in which the game has been localized. As mobile smart phone adoption grows internationally, the percentages of international usage and revenue (after proper localization) will grow rapidly.

Another trend that presents interesting localization challenges is that of cross-platform apps and games; i.e.: switching Facebook, Android and iPhone platforms. Market tiers differ for these platforms, so do the research into what locales feature more prominently for each platform.

Lastly, it is often quoted that India and China are emerging in the mobile market. As of now, however, India does not necessitate language localization and Mainland China does not present a good positive ROI investment for app localization.


Submit a question for Danica for the upcoming webinar Taking your Mobile Apps Global on LocLabs’ Facebook page, Facebook.com/LocLabs


Register for Webinar: Games and Mobile i18n and L10n

 

 

 

 

Game Localization: the Basics

With a number of foreign markets emerging with buying power and tech-aptitude, product managers are focusing more on adapting their products to those foreign markets. This is especially the case with the emergence of smart phones and social networks that are capable of providing a platform for games. The combination of these emerging markets and emerging game platforms has led to an emphasis on localization for game developers.

Game localization is the process of preparing a game for a new locale. It goes beyond simple translation to consider linguistic issues, hardware issues and cultural differences that each target locale requires. Like all forms of localization, game localization has become a paramount task for developers to undertake when creating a new game with so much of the game market coming from non-English speaking countries. From context for translation, to understanding cultural differences, ensuring quality is paramount to a successful international release.

Language

“All your base are belong to us” – an infamous line from the 1991 video game Zero Wing that has become something of a cultural hit. Translating a video game’s dialogue is a tricky task. Translators need to work off of context, something that standalone video game text does not provide. With so many games now allowing users to make their own decisions, the context for each point of dialogue is different in each instant. Planning ahead and providing context to the translation team, instead of just a translation sheet, assures better quality, and better ease of translation.
Also take into consideration that different languages use a different amount of text to convey the same idea. Don’t overlook resizing of text boxes, and ensure that there is enough space available for the necessary text.

Culturalization

Like any product being prepared for a new locale, cultural aspects must be considered when localizing. Games are no different. Typically, gamers in Japan are drawn to younger game characters on a quest to find themselves while American gamers are drawn to older, more rugged ones. The perception of violence, blood and gore in video games will also affect public opinion on a localized game. Keeping track of where those aspects of the game are in your development process will save time when localizing. Do the necessary research to understand what your target market values in a game. Take care of this first, it will prove valuable in the long run.

Legal

Countries have different governing bodies that enforce ratings on games. Issues with violence, sex or foul language must be considered when preparing a game for a new locale. It is possible that a game can be banned if it does not meet the standards set in place by the governing body in a new territory.

Conclusion
Ensuring that all these steps are taken will grant a more successful international release. Taking note of where localization issues will arise, during the initial game development process, will save time and money when aiming for a simultaneous release in multiple markets.

Gamers take value in high-quality games. Taking the necessary steps to understand a foreign market is valuable to the success of a localized game. Developing games for multiple locales? Visit Lingoport.com for internationalization support.