Product Brand Culturalization

Join us for an upcoming webinar on on Thursday, August 25 on adapting your product and brand for specific cultures and markets. Presented by localization and internationalization veterans Talia Baruch and Chris Raulf, this presentation will discuss the challenges that companies take on when moving their brand to a global market. Through their experiences, Baruch and Raulf have developed a deep understanding of what it takes to develop a great relationship between a brand and the needs of the global marketplace.

Registration

Webinar: “Product Brand Culturalization”
Date and Time: Thursday, August 25 at 11am PT / Noon MT / 1pm CT / 2pm ET
Registration: Register for free @ https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/642793497
Where: Your desktop
Presenters: Talia Baruch, Localization & Culturalization Consultant, Copyous and Chris Raulf, Marketing Director, Lingoport

This presentation targets business managers, marketing managers, product managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone else wanting to learn more about the product localization, internationalization, and culturalization process.

For more detailed information, please visit http://www.lingoport.com/webinars/product-brand-culturalization/

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Is Globalization Endangering Increasingly Rare Languages?

This blog post is a summary of a post written by Nigel Hollis for the M&M Blog.

The trend in language and globalization suggests that rare languages only spoken by a few people in specific areas are dying off. Nigel Hollis suggests the opposite is happening is some areas as teenagers in places like the Philippines, Mexico and Chile are reviving their local languages through social media. This attraction to dying languages is an interesting way for young people to identify with a group and feel like they belong. I often see this phenomenon within groups of friends after you have spent a great deal of time with them. You develop your own language or “code”; different phrases have different meanings, inside jokes are developed, and only the people within your group understand the full meaning behind everything you say.

But this developing trend has important consequences that global businesses need to consider. As I have touched on before, social media acts as the face of a company; the place were consumers and potential consumers communicate with each other and with the company about their wants, needs and concerns. Hollis notes groups want to affirm their cultural identity in the face of globalization. People like to stay in their comfort zone, so it is important for companies to provide a forum where their customers feel comfortable. Applying a specific strategy in each locale is paramount to the long-term success of a global business.

For the full article, please visit http://blog.creamglobal.com/right_brain_left_brain/2011/07/digital-media-facilitate-localization-as-well-as-globalization.html

What is “Glocalization”?

A popular new trend in language, it seems, is to combine two words to invent a whole new word. I first heard of glocalization in a human geography class I took back in high school, and though first glance it seemed to be an odd word, it’s meaning is self defined when you realize it’s a combination of globalization and localization. You may have seen “Think Global, Act Local” bumper stickers around town encouraging people to do their part in their local area to yield a better global outlook; this stems from that same idea.

I like to think of glocalization as a sort of grassroots campaign. Instead of the classic globalization tale where products are simply introduced from a point source, the sources grow from everywhere. Globally-centric ideas are spread through direct interactions with a specific locale. Rather than inject an idea into a specific culture, practitioners of glocalization come to understand a locale’s needs and help them develop something to aid that need specifically. If something seems or feels foreign, interest in it fades quickly. This is why when glocalization is taken on in a marketing or product development approach, it is so important to pay attention to what foreign customers are saying so that your company can work together with them to fill their needs.

If you know of any other “combo-words” that have entered into your vocabulary, let us know. Comment below or send us a tweet @lingoport.

Worldware Presentation – The New Information Revolution

Information is being created more quickly and by more people every day. Anybody with internet access now has the ability to spread news and information at broadband speeds. This means that news is coming from millions of point sources, enhancing the web of information that we have already come to know. This information revolution presents a crossroads for companies: get lost in the clutter, or stand out like never before. In this presentation, Andrew Bredenkamp of acrolinx will go over strategies in producing high quality product information that will enhance customer experience and boost development.

Presented by:

Worldware Presentation – I18n Assessments

Software internationalization can be a seemingly arduous task that is difficult to track. The fact is that there are methods to map out and track product globalization; ways that remain compliant and standardized. Speakers from three companies, Adobe, Autodesk and Yahoo!, share their expertise, including what they think works and doesn’t work, in software globalization.

Presented by:

  • Paul-Henri Arnaud, senior process analyst on the localization services engineering team at Autodesk.
  • Michael McKenna, specialist in the globalization of applications and distributed systems at Yahoo!
  • Leandro Reis, globalization team at Adobe.

To view the slides congruent with this presentation, visit http://sites.google.com/site/globalizationassessment/

Foreign Exchange Software Localization Roundtable

Please note that the Foreign Exchange Software Localization Roundtable has been rescheduled for another date. We will provide an update with the new date when we are provided with that information.

On Wednesday March 23, Marita Hoeh, Software Localization Manager for CaridianBCT, will conduct a presentation about the best software localization practices. The presentation will include a discussion about the upcoming challenges for software localization and a case study on CaridianBCT. The event starts at 8:30am at the Renaissance Boulder FlatIron Hotel in Broomfield, CO and will conclude at 11am. Breakfast will be provided as guests will be given a chance to network before the formal presentation begins at 9am.

Marita Hoeh has been working in the localization industry for the past 20 years, formerly specializing in translations for the medical field.

CaridianBCT is a software localization company specialized in medical devices based out of Lakewood, CO.  Hoeh created the software localization department where today she manages the software localization of all products.

Lingoport’s Adam Asnes will also be in attendance to provide his internationalization (i18n) and globalization expertise. Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001, and has since become an authority on internationalization and globalization of software.

Lingoport to be Featured at Worldware Conference

Lingoport’s Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban are going to be featured guests at this year’s Worldware Conference in Santa Clara, California on March 15 as they discuss with developers how to implement, track and improve their internationalization plans to the highest degree using Globalyzer’s static analysis.  The workshop will include an examination of new product development in the internationalization and localization field and how the relationship between project creation and implementation work so well together.

Come ready to learn from the best and share your own ideas. Friends of Lingoport will receive a 10% discount upon registering for the conference (use discount code WW11SLD, not eligible for the preconference). This year’s event looks to be a smashing success!