Internationalizing and Localizing Complex Software Systems in an Agile Environment

Software development is often hindered by communication issues between company stakeholders. The solution to bridge this gap, Agile software development, has been particularly troublesome for internationalization and localization activities. In an hour long webinar, Yuka Kurihara, Director of Localization at Pitney Bowes, joins Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport, and Adam Blau of Milengo to discuss how internationalization and localization efforts can synergize with an Agile software development strategy.

Those interested in software internationalization and localization strategies are encouraged to join on Wednesday, March 2nd at 9am or 2pm (Eastern) for the hour long webinar.

More information on software globalization is also available on the Lingoport site.

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Webinar Recording: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Lingoport recently hosted a Webinar with our friends from ForeignExchange Translations, a leading provider of medical translation and localization services.

Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Jason Heaton, Marketing Manager at Foreign Exchange Translations, discussed basic principles and processes that make medical products different

This interactive online presentation focused on providing attendees with a wealth of medical internationalization and localization knowledge. Adam and Jason discussed product architectures, testing and solutions to verify functional and linguistic accuracy; they also took an in-depth look at:

We recorded the live Webinar and you may view the recording at your leisure right on your desktop.

Click the following link to view the recording of: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Lingoport and Foreign Exchange Translations Webinar: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Internationalization and localization for medical products tends to have special case business drivers and can take on life-and-death importance. First, there’s adapting products for better worldwide sales, but often issues like reducing liabilities and saving lives drive the process just a bit differently.

Join us for an interactive one-hour online presentation as Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations, discuss basic principles and processes that make medical products different.

Webinar: “Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application”
Date: Thursday, December 16th, 2010
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PT
Where: Your desktop
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/242816048
Cost: Complimentary
Presenters: Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations

We’ll discuss product architectures, testing and solutions to verify functional and linguistic accuracy; we’ll also take an in-depth look at:

This event targets global manufacturers of medical device, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and healthcare products, including: localization managers, internationalization managers, software developers, engineers, engineering managers, information developers, and senior executives responsible for international market share as well as customer-side professionals involved in the translation and localization of medical and life sciences content.

Lingoport Webinar: Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4

There is tremendous value in knowing if a product is global-ready as part of your development cycle. Large amounts of development, marketing and branding dollars are at stake. Yet often, the only way software gets verified for localization, is during the localization process itself, or based on a limited series of manual interface testing. That’s way too late in the development cycle to be efficient and a very incomplete way to address the issue.

There are all kinds of products to support issues like software security and efficiency, but how about checking on internationalization, which for many companies is a hefty and vital product requirement for a good share of company revenue?

In this webinar, we’ll be demonstrating how Globalyzer 3.4 (our new release) finds, categorizes, tracks and helps fix internationalization bugs in source code using static analysis.

Webinar: “Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4”
Date: Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
Time:
11am – Noon PST
Where:
Your desktop
Register at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/245577129
Cost: ComplimentaryPresenters: Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport

We’ll start with some source code and then:

  • Analyze it for internationalization issues
  • Customize “rule-sets” so that specific issues to that code can be address
  • Show how that information can be accessed and shared among development team members
  • Integrate automated Globalyzer static analysis via command line
  • Support testing initiatives

The Webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and localization challenges.

Note: We’ll be diving straight into coding issues and will be skipping internationalization basics. If you’re looking for a presentation on internationalization and localization basics, please visit this archived presentation from Localization World: http://vimeo.com/16345751

About the presenters:
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development.

Olivier Libouban, a native of France, has been working for 25 years in the software industry, for large corporations and start-ups, as a software engineer and as a project manager. Olivier has a wide ranging experience in the US, France, Switzerland, and Norway, in R&D departments as well as for client projects of all sizes with complex software environments.

GALA Webinar: Internationalization Basics for Non-Engineers

Join Lingoport CEO Adam Asnes for a webinar on the business and development issues that shape internationalization.  Learn practices that make internationalization a simple part of the process.

Date: Thursday, December 9th @ 11:00 EST
Where: Online
Register: http://www.gala-global.org/gala-webinar-internationalization-basics-non-engineers
Cost: Free to Lingoport customers and affiliates (select “I’m a customer of a GALA member” when registering)

While many GALA members are extremely proficient with localization, internationalization is often just barely understood, or not at all. Yet a poorly internationalized product will give localization efforts sub-par results and reflect poorly on the localization – not the development. Additionally, when a client approaches internationalization, the efforts are often not systematic, making quality a risky endeavor.

Join Adam for this hands-on webinar featuring practical real world advice based on extensive software globalization experience over a wide breadth of technologies and applications.

This interactive online event targets professionals involved in helping their company succeed in international markets, including internationalization and localization managers, project and program managers, international marketing managers, senior executives responsible for international market share.

About the presenter
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001. As Lingoport’s president and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development. Adam is a frequent speaker on globalization technology as it affects businesses expanding their worldwide reach.

GALA webinars are free for GALA members and potential buyers of translation and localization services. ALC members may attend for $25. The registration fee for employees of non-member language service and technology companies is $129. (These fees will be waived and applied toward GALA membership if your company is eligible for membership and joins within one month of the webinar.)

The business case why US companies need to internationalize their software in order to sell to the Canadian Government

In Adam Asnes’ article in the September 2010 issue of MultiLingual, he illustrated how business cases for US companies can drive their need to internationalize their software in order to sell to the Canadian Government, or to sell broadly in Quebec. I liked in his article how he mentioned that companies may adapt their software because of sales-driven reasons rather than part of a broad global marketing initiative, which have “different needs-drivers reflected in deadlines, resources and scope” than regular, consistent localization projects.

Adam goes on to describe very well, for both the techie and sales person alike (me for example), what needs to be completed to get the software localization-ready and how Lingoport rocks at helping companies with that process. Here at Milengo, we assist clients with their language support commonly after Lingoport has finished their work. And we too notice clients’ needs for Canadian Language support is different when it is deal-based, rather than as part of a broader sales plan, so I too will focus my ideas on that part. I wanted to use this blog to illustrate some examples of projects we’ve worked on to give readers ideas on what processes and technology are available and what is do-able, to help stretch your budget when sales lands a big new deal in Canada.

Let’s make the assumption that your company is doing very well and the software you produce is awesome. Sales are booming in North America. The Sales Director got a big contract with the Canadian Government. Big deal and big money. It’s signed after the champagne has been popped, you’re told that you have 3 months to deliver a Canadian French version, with documentation, since it’s required by law in Canada. And if it’s late, the company will have to pay a fine for every-day its late, eating into profits and good will. So after a big gulp of bubbly, the process begins.

Luckily, you know Lingoport already from Adam’s excellent articles in Multilingual. His company helps your developers in completing the i18n of the software so that it can be localized. He did it on-budget and before he promised, just because that’s how Lingoport rolls. Milestone 1 completed. Then you see you have about 10,000 strings for translation as well as help and user manuals, which require about 200,000 words for translation. Oy vey. The volume is too much for your staff in Canada to do it internally within this timeframe. What options can you consider?

Option 1: Have an LSP do the translation for you. Luckily, your sales team collaborated with you closely and the deal was priced to allow for high-quality human translations in Canada. You can create a glossary from the software translation, which forms a bed-rock for future updates. Consistency in your software, documentation and customer communication is recorded and used across all documents, lowering costs, increasing quality and enhancing the brand experience (a big topic that we’ll go into another time). Sounds good, right? With all those happy French-speaking Canadian customers, it may get you thinking that a more developed localization strategy might not be a bad idea after all?

Option 2: Your sales team did not collaborate with you, and the overall price of the package sold was too low. Your manager is balking at the double-digit figures for the cost of the documentation localization since the budget is not available and you have limited financial resources. Alternatively, perhaps its not a priority to have this done with high-quality human translations since this is a one-off deal. Options to consider include:

  • One of Milengo’s customers had some 1.5 million words of help-desk and customer support information that needed to be translated in a month a half in order to outsource call-center operations. Do-able? Yes! Did they have a budget of ~ $500,000? No. To get around this we worked with our partner AsiaOnline to develop a customized, enterprise-level statistical machine translation engine that uses sophisticated algorithms to provide machine translation results. To make the translations publish-ready, human linguists reviewed the machine translation output to correct errors, fix stylistic problems, etc so that it looked and felt correct. The overall saving was over 50%.
  • You want to leverage your in-house team of people in Canada, but need to make them more efficient. How about taking the glossary from your UI and use it as a basis within the Google Translator Toolkit? The Google engine will produce a translation for you using your glossary as a reference point, and afterwards, your in-house team can correct and fix the errors and improve style. Or you can have an LSP like Milengo do it for you. Depending on the nature of the content or corporate culture, if may not be appropriate, but it is an option that you can consider. Google is doing more and more of their own translations this way, and we’ve helped them with correcting the output of their translations using their own toolkit.

Option 3: You can do a mishmash of all 3 above. The UI is translated by your in-house staff (i.e “the humans”) since they are the experts. The documentation is translated by AsiaOnline’s customized statistical machine translation with human post-editing, and Google Translator Toolkit is used for internal communication in Canadian French <> English.

Option 4: While the above mentioned scenario is unlikely since you are internationalizing your software for the first time, if you did have a French translation, we could leverage that considerably. An adaptation from Continental French to Canadian can be done. While both languages are French, there are of course differences and copy-editors can go through and change terminology, style and make the local feel local, saving considerable time and budget.

There you have it. Of course each option, scenario and client requirement is more complicated and detailed than portrayed here, but hopefully it gets the juices flowing in terms of what can be done.

Post written by Adam Blau, Rebellion Leader at Milengo, a global language services provider.