Is Globalization Endangering Increasingly Rare Languages?

This blog post is a summary of a post written by Nigel Hollis for the M&M Blog.

The trend in language and globalization suggests that rare languages only spoken by a few people in specific areas are dying off. Nigel Hollis suggests the opposite is happening is some areas as teenagers in places like the Philippines, Mexico and Chile are reviving their local languages through social media. This attraction to dying languages is an interesting way for young people to identify with a group and feel like they belong. I often see this phenomenon within groups of friends after you have spent a great deal of time with them. You develop your own language or “code”; different phrases have different meanings, inside jokes are developed, and only the people within your group understand the full meaning behind everything you say.

But this developing trend has important consequences that global businesses need to consider. As I have touched on before, social media acts as the face of a company; the place were consumers and potential consumers communicate with each other and with the company about their wants, needs and concerns. Hollis notes groups want to affirm their cultural identity in the face of globalization. People like to stay in their comfort zone, so it is important for companies to provide a forum where their customers feel comfortable. Applying a specific strategy in each locale is paramount to the long-term success of a global business.

For the full article, please visit http://blog.creamglobal.com/right_brain_left_brain/2011/07/digital-media-facilitate-localization-as-well-as-globalization.html

Internationalization Software Globalyzer 3.6 Release

The latest Globalyzer Release Features new Programming Languages, new Rule Sets, Additional Support to Help Software Development Teams Share the String Externalization Work, and an Internationalization Scorecard

Lingoport, a provider of i18n tools and internationalization consulting services, announced yesterday the release of Globalyzer 3.6. Lingoport also announced that it will participate in an online panel presentation along with Zynga, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, to discuss software development and localization on Wednesday, August 3rd.

Globalyzer—a client/server software internationalization system—assists development teams in internationalizing source code as an integral part of future releases. Globalyzer finds, fixes, and monitors issues quickly so that software applications are ready for localization and worldwide customer requirements.

The latest Globalyzer release features many new enhancements, including new supported programming languages: Qt and ActionScript plus enhanced XML and MXML support. Globalyzer 3.6 also adds shared string externalization support to help development teams working together on internationalization efforts as well as an internationalization scorecard, enabling managers to track key internationalization metrics over time.

Adam Asnes, founder and CEO of Lingoport, notes: “We are very excited to announce that Globalyzer is further extending support for programming languages like ActionScript, used in Flex and Flash applications, and enterprise global readiness analysis that we’ve seen become more important among our customers. We also keep adding features to help teams of developers support internationalization, as that’s an endeavor that runs across teams rather than just individual developers.” He continues: “More than ever, Globalyzer assures that a software application is global-ready as part of the development cycle, thus enabling companies to enter new markets faster while raising quality and lowering worldwide development, translation, and support costs.”

Lingoport’s software i18n tool now also features an internationalization scorecard. The scorecard system provides a dashboard of internationalization status and progress using XML data collected via scan history using Globalyzer’s Command Line. The i18n scorecard was recently discussed in an hour-long webinar presentation and featured guest-speakers Mike McKenna, Sr. Manager, International Engineering, from Zynga, and Leandro Reis, Senior Globalization Program Manager, from Adobe Systems. A recording of the presentation may be viewed at: http://www.lingoport.com/internationalization-webinar-video/#17

The Globalyzer 3.6 release notes are available on Lingoport’s website at:http://www.lingoport.com/software-internationalization-products/globalyzer-3/release-notes/

University of Washington to Offer Localization Certificate Program

The University of Washington Professional & Continuing Education is offering a Certificate program in localization which provides an overview of and practical experience with this rapidly growing field through a three-course, nine-month program. The courses are offered in the evening and can be taken in the classroom as well as online. They provide a strong foundation in terms of concepts and tools, engineering practices, and project management. Students gain valuable practical experience, hear from guest speakers working in the industry, research and use current translation & localization tools, as well as delve into both the engineering and the project management side. The classroom section is a traditional offering while the online section uses AdobeConnect to allow online students to hear the instructor live, see the instructor’s presentation, and interact with the class via chat. Online sessions are also recorded.

General program areas include linguistics & translation, business norms & cultural issues, user-interface design, formatting, project workflow & roles and an overview of the technology & tools. In addition, the program includes guest speakers and a panel of practitioners some of whom graduated from the program to talk about their career and what is needed to get a job in the field. Specific consideration is given to topics such as alphabets & scripts, character encoding, text processing, graphical representation of text, spelling variants for different countries where the same language is spoken, cultural appropriateness, language translations, symbols, aesthetics, local content as well as customs considerations.

Past students have come from diverse backgrounds, including foreign language learners, translators, software testers, technical writers, linguistics, software developers, project managers, and localization engineers.

The program has an advisory board which includes UW faculty & staff, as well as industry representatives from Microsoft, Lionbridge, Adobe, Getty Images, Google, MultiLingual Magazine, Adaquest, and several others. Students who complete all three courses receive a Certificate from UW Professional & Continuing Education. From a career perspective we can also attest to the fact that students who enrolled in the program received both internships & jobs soon after completing the program. These positions included companies such as Microsoft, Real Networks, Amazon.com, SDL, Big Fish, Nintendo, Übermind, and Moravia.

Applications are now being accepted for the program starting October 5, 2011. Additional program details and course descriptions can be found here: http://www.pce.uw.edu/prog.aspx?id=6040

A Robotic Introduction to Bridging the Gap between Software Development and Localization

So, you’ve developed a new software application, and have high aspirations in terms of selling your application to a global audience. Now what? Problems often arise between developers, localization managers, and business managers due to perceived lack of support, time, and money.

This lack of understanding can lead to great frustration within the development tiers. Join us for an hour long online panel discussion and learn how some of the best known industry thought leaders are contributing to bridging the gap between software development and localization.

Join us Wednesday, August 3rd at 9:30am PT for a discussion led by a panel of experts on Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization. Registration is available at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

Upcoming Webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization

Mister Zebra and Miss Giraffe introduce you to Lingoport’s next webinar: Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization.

This webinar will feature a panel of software development, internationalization and localization professionals and will be held on Wednesday, August 3rd at 12:30pm EDT.

Technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, technical writers, content developers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to optimize their global software releases are encouraged to attend.

Sign up here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/964415249

How Does Localization Relate to Social Media?

This post was inspired by an article written by Clinton Lanier on Technorati. The article can be viewed here: http://technorati.com/business/article/a-new-theory-of-social-media/

Many companies use social media to get in direct contact with their customer base. This allows consumers to engage with each other as well as the product makers about their issues, concerns, recommendations or satisfaction with a product. This instant feedback approach has reshaped how companies deal with customers: feedback is instant.

But what if their is no forum for your company’s customers to discuss their concerns in their own language using their own forum? Companies that have localized their product to multiple locales need also to consider localizing their social media messages for that same location. As I wrote before in a post about localized software in China, a successfully localized product considers all aspects of a product, not just translation. This same idea applies to the social aspects of said product.

A feedback avenue should be established for international customers to discuss their concerns, just as there is for domestic customers. In his article, Lanier suggests companies establish a social media presence in every locale they sell in, but his argument doesn’t necessarily apply to tech companies. His examples include Starbucks and Panera Bread shaping their message to specific demographics across a country (Happy Cinco de Mayo! Show this tweet and receive a free drink!). This messaging is effective for its goal, but goals as they relate to software and technology are obviously different (and that’s what we’re focusing on here).

Companies that have localized well have already established a presence within the locales they sell in. Assuming a trust has been created between the company and the consumer in a locale, setting up a social media avenue should be easy. My suggestion would be to do a little research into what social media platforms are most popular in a given locale, and set up an account focused on that area. Assuming your product has already been localized to that area, you should be familiar with the concerns of customers in that locale. Use this background information to establish a dialogue with customers to help further refine your product. Localization isn’t a one-time process, it’s ongoing and never ending as technology improves at an incredible rate. Staying on the front lines through social media will undoubtedly help shape a successful localization campaign.

Top Five Reasons Localization isn’t even a Choice Anymore

With so many internet users and gamers consuming content in a language other than English, development companies no longer have the choice whether to localize or not; it’s a must! The following is the top five reasons why localization can no longer be overlooked.

  1. Because your competitors will gain the upper hand on you. If you’re not going to localize, someone else will. Since consumers best identify with products in their own language, they will gain a respect for your competitor for their product and overlook you.
  2. 75% of gamers come from non-English speaking markets. This doesn’t include all the high-tech games on Xbox and PS3; games like FarmVille and Mafia Wars are immensely popular in their localized versions.
  3. Non-native English speaking web users are growing rapidly. This new developing group represents a new market websites and game developers can target. 90% of these users prefer to use the web in their own language.
  4. Many immigrant communities need translated material for legal purposes. There is a real demand in the market requiring companies to address visitors of their web sites in languages other than English.
  5. People prefer buying in their own language. Have you ever traveled abroad and felt awkward when purchasing something because you either don’t know exactly what it is or aren’t sure of the conversion? Having access to that knowledge is powerful in the hands of the consumer.

Read more: 

 

Localized & Free Software Key to Chinese Breakthrough

This post is a summary of an article on ZDNet posted on June 2, 2011. Link to the full article is available below.

Recent analysis by Chinese Market Research’s (CMR) business analyst Irene Yu suggests that it is vital for software companies and developers to localize before porting their products over to Chinese markets. Yu also adds that there are a number of cultural differences that western companies need to consider.  Chinese consumers interact differently on the web than do western consumers as they are more likely to share their opinions and experiences of a product or brand. Due to this, simple translation of software isn’t enough to introducing a new product in China; cultural tendencies need to be explored and accounted for.

Additionally, demand in China for paid software continues to grow; however, many Chinese consumers prefer a free version of a product in which they can pay for add ons later: users often like to check the quality of a product before purchasing the full version. A problem arises, though, with the availability of pirated/cracked software in China. To make up for this, companies looking to grow in China are providing the basic version of their software for free, with paid add ins. The best model for this is the integration of Plants vs. Zombies, a free social game in which users can purchase virtual goods.

For the full version of this article posted June 2, 2011 on ZDNet, visit http://www.zdnetasia.com/free-localization-key-to-china-breakthrough-62300567.htm

What is “Glocalization”?

A popular new trend in language, it seems, is to combine two words to invent a whole new word. I first heard of glocalization in a human geography class I took back in high school, and though first glance it seemed to be an odd word, it’s meaning is self defined when you realize it’s a combination of globalization and localization. You may have seen “Think Global, Act Local” bumper stickers around town encouraging people to do their part in their local area to yield a better global outlook; this stems from that same idea.

I like to think of glocalization as a sort of grassroots campaign. Instead of the classic globalization tale where products are simply introduced from a point source, the sources grow from everywhere. Globally-centric ideas are spread through direct interactions with a specific locale. Rather than inject an idea into a specific culture, practitioners of glocalization come to understand a locale’s needs and help them develop something to aid that need specifically. If something seems or feels foreign, interest in it fades quickly. This is why when glocalization is taken on in a marketing or product development approach, it is so important to pay attention to what foreign customers are saying so that your company can work together with them to fill their needs.

If you know of any other “combo-words” that have entered into your vocabulary, let us know. Comment below or send us a tweet @lingoport.

Worldware Presentation – The New Information Revolution

Information is being created more quickly and by more people every day. Anybody with internet access now has the ability to spread news and information at broadband speeds. This means that news is coming from millions of point sources, enhancing the web of information that we have already come to know. This information revolution presents a crossroads for companies: get lost in the clutter, or stand out like never before. In this presentation, Andrew Bredenkamp of acrolinx will go over strategies in producing high quality product information that will enhance customer experience and boost development.

Presented by:

Worldware Presentation – Emerging Markets

Emerging markets can no longer be overlooked as global economic opportunities have become more desirable for companies to explore. Join three industry leaders as they share their experiences in entering emerging markets, the differences between an emerging market and a well established market, and what strategies have worked for their respective companies.

Presented by:

  • Ghassan Haddad, Facebook’s internationalization director
  • Bob Jung, Google’s director of software engineering for internationalization
  • Nico Ponser, LinkedIn’s principle international product manager

Free IMUG Networking Event at Worldware

Finish up this year’s Worldware Conference in style at the free IMUG Networking Event. Leaders in internationalization and localization Lingoport and acrolinx are sponsoring the event that will feature food and drinks at 6pm followed by a brief user discussion session from 7-7:30pm, and some more friendly networking until 9pm.

Please RSVP and plan to arrive at the Techmart in Santa Clara at 6pm; the event runs till 9pm. Those in attendance do not need to be registered for the Worldware Conference.

For registration information, please view: http://www.imug.org/events/index.html

Internationalizing and Localizing Complex Software Systems in an Agile Environment

Software development is often hindered by communication issues between company stakeholders. The solution to bridge this gap, Agile software development, has been particularly troublesome for internationalization and localization activities. In an hour long webinar, Yuka Kurihara, Director of Localization at Pitney Bowes, joins Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport, and Adam Blau of Milengo to discuss how internationalization and localization efforts can synergize with an Agile software development strategy.

Those interested in software internationalization and localization strategies are encouraged to join on Wednesday, March 2nd at 9am or 2pm (Eastern) for the hour long webinar.

More information on software globalization is also available on the Lingoport site.

Palo Alto Localization Technology Round Table

The Palo Alto Localization Technology Roundtable on Thursday, Feb. 3rd, 2011 brings together 5 industry leaders to present an open technology framework that speeds up time to market and drastically reduces your localization and translation costs.

Together, Lingoport, acrolinx, Clay Tablet, Milengo and Asia Online will show how advanced, modular localization technology addresses the… challenges faced when launching products or services to international markets in multiple languages.

You’ll learn the key considerations when taking an international product from design to launch through, Internationalization, Information Authoring, Content Management, Localization and Translation Automation.

And you’ll learn how this is achievable quickly, and with fewer resources, while maintaining a consistent brand and user experience that builds value, saves time and reduces costs.

You will also:

* Access a wealth of localization experience from industry experts
* Discover new technologies and new ways of working that are already changing the localization landscape
* Learn strategies that can streamline your localization efforts and help you quickly launch products worldwide
* Share information with like-minded peers and learn proven practices that you’ll find nowhere else

The Localization Technology Round Table event is free of charge, open to customer-side industry professionals and will be held at the Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, in Palo Alto, CA 94306.

Learn more and register at: http://bit.ly/fbQZ9p

Watch the Videos from the Boston Localization Technology Round Table

The Boston Localization Technology Round Table event was a great success. Nearly 40 customer-side industry professionals registered for the live event, and 100+ people registered for viewing the live-stream from the event.

For each of us presenting, it was a great chance to offer something new for the industry—a way to bring the conference to the event attendees and feature best practices and efficiencies offered by five separate but complementary companies. We hope that the attendees learned something, met a colleague or two, and gained some valuable perspective. We all enjoyed the event too and are already planning our next Roundtable in the Bay Area this coming February. Connect with us on social media and be the first to learn about upcoming events and much more: http://www.lingoport.com/socialmedia

The video recordings of each individual session from the Boston Localization Technology Round Table are now available for viewing on the Lingoport Website.

Click here to view the rest of the videos from the Boston Localization Technology Round Table event.

Don’t hesitate to contact the presenters directly if should you have any questions or if you would like to learn more about their services and tools:

Clay Tablet
Robinson Kelly
rkelly@clay-tablet.com
www.clay-tablet.com

Asia Online
Kirti Vashee
kirti.vashee@asiaonline.net
www.asiaonline.net

Milengo
Adam Blau
adam.blau@milengo.com
www.milengo.com

acrolinx
Kent Taylor
Kent.Taylor@acrolinx.com
www.acrolinx.com

Lingoport
Adam Asnes
aasnes@lingoport.com
www.lingoport.com

Adam Asnes and Angelika Zerfass to present at LocalizationWorld: Intro to Internationalization and Localization

Internationalization and Localization experts Adam Asnes, of Lingoport, and Angelika Zerfaß, of zaac, are going to present at this years’ LocWorld. Their session is titled “Intro to Internationalization and Localization” and will be moderated by Daniel Goldschmidt, principal consultant and cofounder of RIGI Localization Solutions.

Their presentation will give an overview over the different areas in internationalization and localization projects where best practices exist — starting from the concept of internationalization and how it is applied to project management dos and don’ts and the tools and technologies used in the field.

Join them on Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 10:15am: Intro to Internationalization and Localization

Internationalization (I18n) expert Adam Asnes to present at LocWorld 2010

Lingoport Press Release The Localization Technology Round Table Event Series

Lingoport, a leading provider of software internationalization tools and consulting services, acrolinx GmbH, the world’s leading provider of Information Quality Management software, Milengo, a global language service provider, Asia Online, a provider of near-human quality mass translations, and Clay Tablet, a provider of translation integration software systems, announced today that the five companies will present the Localization Technology Roundtable Event Series Tuesday, October 19th in Boston, Wednesday, October 20th in New York, and Thursday, October 21st in Washington, DC.

Read Press Release: “Lingoport, acrolinx, Milengo, Clay Tablet, and Asia Online to Host Localization Technology Roundtable Event Series”

Localization Technology Roundtable Event Series

Are you challenged with finding more efficient ways to launch your company’s solutions faster, with fewer resources, and less expensive in multiple languages? Are you faced with maintaining a consistent brand and user experience when entering new global markets?

Lingoport, a leading provider of software internationalization tools and services, acrolinx, the world’s leading provider of Information Quality Management software, Milengo, a global language service provider, Asia Online, a provider of near-human quality mass translations, and Clay Tablet, a provider of translation integration software systems, have joined forces  and will present how advanced, modular globalization, localization, and translation technologies simplify the process when launching products or services to international markets in multiple languages.

Event: “Localization Technology Roundtable”

Dates and Locations:

  • Tuesday, October 19th in Boston
  • Wednesday, October 20th in New York
  • Thursday, October 21st in Washington, DC.

Agenda and Registration: http://www.lingoport.com/localization-technology-roundtable

Cost: Complimentary

Presenters: Adam Asnes, Lingoport President and CEO, Kent Taylor, VP and General Manager at acrolinx, Robinson Kelly, Founder and CEO of Clay Tablet, Renato Beninatto, CEO of Milengo, and Kirti Vashee, Vice President of Sales, Americas and Europe of Asia Online

Who should attend: The Localization Technology Roundtable Event Series targets Senior Executives responsible for international market share, Technical/Engineering Managers, as well as professionals involved in helping their company succeed in international markets.

Why should you attend:

The Localization Technology Roundtable Event Series allows attendees to:

  • Access a wealth of information from globalization and localization industry experts.
  • Discover new technologies and techniques to launch products worldwide faster and cheaper.
  • Share information with industry leaders and network with their peers in an informal atmosphere.

Your company’s offerings for world markets are often critical factors for growth, profitability and long term value. This is a unique opportunity to learn from experienced industry veterans about practical ways to measurably improve what can easily be either one of the greatest strengths of your company, or a messy, delayed and expensive misadventure.

For additional information, please feel free to contact Chris Raulf by email at craulf@lingoport.com or call 303.444.8020 x705.

Free Webinar: Writing and Documenting Software for the World with Agile Demands

Entering new global markets can be highly rewarding, yet companies are often faced with cutting costs and rapidly deploying high quality products. In order to succeed in today’s challenging business environment, global companies need to embrace more efficient content authoring processes and often look for tools to assist in this process.

Webinar: Writing and Documenting Software for the World with Agile Demands
Date: Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010
Time: 10:00 am – 11:00 am PDT
Where: Your desktop
Register at: https://acrolinx.webex.com/acrolinx/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=664506417
Cost: Complimentary
Presenters: Kent Taylor, VP and General Manager at acrolinx, Adam Asnes, Lingoport President and CEO, and special guest Mike McKenna, Globalization Manager at Yahoo!

As part of this Webinar, software authoring, internationalization, and globalization experts Kent Taylor of acrolinx, Adam Asnes of Lingoport, and Mike McKenna of Yahoo! will share their views and discuss a variety of best practices, including:

  • Increasing production time for documentation with reuse
  • Decreasing translation costs by decreasing the amount of documentation
  • Integrating internationalization into the software and content development cycle

This event targets professionals involved in helping their company succeed in international markets, including Software Developers, Engineers, Engineering Managers, Internationalization and Localization Managers, Information Developers, Technical Writers, and Senior Executives responsible for international market share.

The business case why US companies need to internationalize their software in order to sell to the Canadian Government

In Adam Asnes’ article in the September 2010 issue of MultiLingual, he illustrated how business cases for US companies can drive their need to internationalize their software in order to sell to the Canadian Government, or to sell broadly in Quebec. I liked in his article how he mentioned that companies may adapt their software because of sales-driven reasons rather than part of a broad global marketing initiative, which have “different needs-drivers reflected in deadlines, resources and scope” than regular, consistent localization projects.

Adam goes on to describe very well, for both the techie and sales person alike (me for example), what needs to be completed to get the software localization-ready and how Lingoport rocks at helping companies with that process. Here at Milengo, we assist clients with their language support commonly after Lingoport has finished their work. And we too notice clients’ needs for Canadian Language support is different when it is deal-based, rather than as part of a broader sales plan, so I too will focus my ideas on that part. I wanted to use this blog to illustrate some examples of projects we’ve worked on to give readers ideas on what processes and technology are available and what is do-able, to help stretch your budget when sales lands a big new deal in Canada.

Let’s make the assumption that your company is doing very well and the software you produce is awesome. Sales are booming in North America. The Sales Director got a big contract with the Canadian Government. Big deal and big money. It’s signed after the champagne has been popped, you’re told that you have 3 months to deliver a Canadian French version, with documentation, since it’s required by law in Canada. And if it’s late, the company will have to pay a fine for every-day its late, eating into profits and good will. So after a big gulp of bubbly, the process begins.

Luckily, you know Lingoport already from Adam’s excellent articles in Multilingual. His company helps your developers in completing the i18n of the software so that it can be localized. He did it on-budget and before he promised, just because that’s how Lingoport rolls. Milestone 1 completed. Then you see you have about 10,000 strings for translation as well as help and user manuals, which require about 200,000 words for translation. Oy vey. The volume is too much for your staff in Canada to do it internally within this timeframe. What options can you consider?

Option 1: Have an LSP do the translation for you. Luckily, your sales team collaborated with you closely and the deal was priced to allow for high-quality human translations in Canada. You can create a glossary from the software translation, which forms a bed-rock for future updates. Consistency in your software, documentation and customer communication is recorded and used across all documents, lowering costs, increasing quality and enhancing the brand experience (a big topic that we’ll go into another time). Sounds good, right? With all those happy French-speaking Canadian customers, it may get you thinking that a more developed localization strategy might not be a bad idea after all?

Option 2: Your sales team did not collaborate with you, and the overall price of the package sold was too low. Your manager is balking at the double-digit figures for the cost of the documentation localization since the budget is not available and you have limited financial resources. Alternatively, perhaps its not a priority to have this done with high-quality human translations since this is a one-off deal. Options to consider include:

  • One of Milengo’s customers had some 1.5 million words of help-desk and customer support information that needed to be translated in a month a half in order to outsource call-center operations. Do-able? Yes! Did they have a budget of ~ $500,000? No. To get around this we worked with our partner AsiaOnline to develop a customized, enterprise-level statistical machine translation engine that uses sophisticated algorithms to provide machine translation results. To make the translations publish-ready, human linguists reviewed the machine translation output to correct errors, fix stylistic problems, etc so that it looked and felt correct. The overall saving was over 50%.
  • You want to leverage your in-house team of people in Canada, but need to make them more efficient. How about taking the glossary from your UI and use it as a basis within the Google Translator Toolkit? The Google engine will produce a translation for you using your glossary as a reference point, and afterwards, your in-house team can correct and fix the errors and improve style. Or you can have an LSP like Milengo do it for you. Depending on the nature of the content or corporate culture, if may not be appropriate, but it is an option that you can consider. Google is doing more and more of their own translations this way, and we’ve helped them with correcting the output of their translations using their own toolkit.

Option 3: You can do a mishmash of all 3 above. The UI is translated by your in-house staff (i.e “the humans”) since they are the experts. The documentation is translated by AsiaOnline’s customized statistical machine translation with human post-editing, and Google Translator Toolkit is used for internal communication in Canadian French <> English.

Option 4: While the above mentioned scenario is unlikely since you are internationalizing your software for the first time, if you did have a French translation, we could leverage that considerably. An adaptation from Continental French to Canadian can be done. While both languages are French, there are of course differences and copy-editors can go through and change terminology, style and make the local feel local, saving considerable time and budget.

There you have it. Of course each option, scenario and client requirement is more complicated and detailed than portrayed here, but hopefully it gets the juices flowing in terms of what can be done.

Post written by Adam Blau, Rebellion Leader at Milengo, a global language services provider.